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🔮Eugene Cernan - Last Czechoslovak on the Moon Apollo17

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Published on Jul 16, 2009

http://marklarson.com/genecernan/
In June 2008 visited Prague with his Granddaughter, including an exhibition at the National Museum and journalists provided an interesting reflection on the next flights to the moon.
Eugene Andrew Cernan (born March 14, 1934) - the last person to walk on the moon. A native of Chicago, Illinois, son of a Czech mother and a Slovak father, he received his father's name, originally spelled Ondrej Čerƈan. He is a retired United States Navy officer and a former NASA astronaut of Czechoslovak ancestry. He has been into space three times: as co-pilot of Gemini 9A in June 1966; as lunar module pilot of Apollo 10 in May 1969; and as commander of Apollo 17 in December 1972. In that final lunar landing mission, Cernan became "the last man on the moon" since he was the last to re-enter the Apollo Lunar Module during its third and final extra-vehicular activity (EVA). Cernan is one of only three humans to voyage to the moon on two different occasions (the others being Jim Lovell and John Young), one of only twelve people to walk on the moon and the only person to have descended to the moon in the lunar-lander twice (of which the first was a non-landing test mission). Cernan orbited the moon on Apollo 10, and landed on the moon on Apollo 17.
Cernan's distinction as the last person to walk on the moon meant that Purdue University would hold the distinction of being the alma mater of both the first person to walk on the moon (Neil Armstrong) and the last person to walk on the moon (Cernan). While on the moon during Apollo 17, he and his crewmate Harrison Schmitt performed three EVAs for a total of about 22 hours of exploration. As Cernan got ready to climb the ladder he spoke these words, the last currently spoken by a human standing on the moon's surface: "As we leave the Moon at Taurus-Littrow, we leave as we came, and God willing, as we shall return, with peace and hope for all mankind. As I take these last steps from the surface for some time to come, I'd just like to record that America's challenge of today has forged man's destiny of tomorrow. Godspeed the crew of Apollo Seventeen."
In June 2008 visited Prague with his Granddaughter, including an exhibition at the National Museum and journalists provided an interesting reflection on the next flights to the moon.

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