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Evelin Lindner: Global Citizenship as Path to Dignity and Prevention of Humiliation

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Published on Oct 31, 2011

"Global Citizenship as Path to Dignity and Prevention of Humiliation" is a video clip that was recorded on October 30, 2011, in Portland, Oregon, USA, by Linda Hartling, for the World Dignity University initiative.
Evelin Lindner writes (in one of her upcoming books on dignity): "The caring element in anthropologist Alan Page Fiske's communal sharing (CS) template is currently stepping into the limelight and is taken more seriously, however, it needs to be highlighted and prioritized more, and more systematically.
The global village is currently acquiring a life of its own, beyond McLuhan's initial connotations, but this process needs to be guided proactively. Citizens increasingly relate to each other across borders, states are losing their status as more or less isolated entities that constrain and define their citizens' global relationships, however, such relationships can turn sour. Global terrorism is only one example for the fact that globalization does not necessarily lead to global friendship.
Even though a global "supranational We-feeling" is in the making, and the "struggle for recognition" by individuals alongside that of states is emerging as a force at the system level, such tendencies need to be nurtured and helped forward more systematically. We do see postindividual consciousness emerge (G. Heard, The Five Ages of Man, 1963), or unity consciousness (M. Hollick, The Science of Oneness: A Worldview for the Twenty-First Century, 2006), or a "Kantian culture" of collective security or "friendship" (A. Wendt, Social Theory of International Politics, 1999), or a global civic culture (E. Boulding, Building a Global Civic Culture: Education for an Interdependent World, 1988), or a world society (Alexander Wendt's stage three).
A growing number of people are now joining the so-called cultural creatives movement and refuse "cynical realism" (P. H. Ray and S. R. Anderson, The Cultural Creatives: How 50 Million People Are Changing the World, 2000). Paul H. Ray and Sherry Ruth Anderson identify three main cultural tendencies: firstly moderns (endorsing the "realist" worldview of Time Magazine, the Wall Street Journal, big government, big business, big media, or past socialist, communist, and fascist movements); second, the first countermovement against moderns, the traditionals (the religious right and rural populations); and third, the most recent countermovement, the cultural creatives (valuing strong ecological sustainability for the planet, liberal on women's issues, personal growth, authenticity, and antibig business). In the United States, traditionals comprise about 24-26 percent of the adult population (approximately 48 million people), moderns about 47-49 percent (approximately 95 million) and cultural creatives are about 26-28 percent (approximately 50 million). In the European Union, the cultural creatives are about 30-35 percent of the adult population.
What is lacking at the current point in human history is global leadership that informs the creation of a decent global community of social and ecological sustainability, following the call for a decent society by philosopher Avishai Margalit (The Decent Society, 1996). Viable global superordinate institutional structures are still lacking, structures that can effectively overcome Hobbesian anarchy among citizens and states and that can successfully attend to the wounds humankind has inflicted on its ecological environment."
See more on www.humiliationstudies.org/whoweare/evelin02.php.

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