Loading...

Should You Write Your Own Obituary

473 views

Loading...

Loading...

Transcript

The interactive transcript could not be loaded.

Loading...

Loading...

Rating is available when the video has been rented.
This feature is not available right now. Please try again later.
Uploaded on Dec 7, 2011

http://www.deathplanningchecklist.com, http://www.GaryAkinMLM.com, 832-326-3678 This video points out some very good suggestions as to why one should really consider writing their own obituary. Again it is emphasized that it really is a persons opportunity to put down what they want said about them and any particular message they might want to leave friends and family. The answer to the question, should I write my own obituary, is a definite yes. YOU can do it better and easier than anyone else. Do it while you're alive; don't depend on someone else once you are gone. Only you know what you want to say about your life. One of the most compelling reasons to write your obituary is that you will be able to say whatever you want without fear of contradiction!
You will save your loved ones a lot of stress if you write your own, at least up to the last year or so. Whatever you do, be sure to file your work in a place everyone knows about so it will be easy to find after your death.
All the preliminary work you do is leading up to the actual writing of your obituary. Gather data from your family's past, your current family birth data, major events in your life, your medical history, your work history, and stories from your siblings and others who have impacted on your life. Then you're ready to do some creative writing.
People who read your obituary are most interested in the really great stories of your past and those of your friends and loved ones. Be sure to mention the events everyone can relate to.

Listed below are the specific projects involved in gathering data to include in your obituary.
FAMILY INFORMATION (GENEALOGY)
Make a listing of everybody in your family (brothers, sisters, aunts, uncles, cousins--all of them) showing their birth date (you may want to include those who have died; in that case, you'll also show date of death).
Recording family information and birth dates is just the beginning, and it's a big job. But everything you do will be helpful in preparing your obituary and historically helpful to those who follow after you.
TIME LINE OF IMPORTANT EVENTS
What are "major events?" Only you know:
Create a time line and a record of significant major family and personal historical events because some day someone will want to know when "it" happened. Start with identifying the event, followed by the year it happened (or your best guess), the date it happened (or your best guess), where it happened, and ends with a description of the event.
Even though many of the things you include in your time line won't make it to your obituary, the information is important to your survivors. Some of the really distinctive events that happened in your life are undated or, worse, unknown, to your family. Be sure to write about them.
The listing becomes the basis for your biography and your obituary. It also is an important historical document.
MAJOR MEDICAL EVENTS
Listing the major medical events in your life may prove to be of value to your children—especially if your illness was caused by an inherited trait.
YOUR WORK HISTORY
If your career in business had high points that would be of interest to others, include those specifics. Don't dwell on the jobs you've held; but major accomplishments are of interest.
YOUR RELIGIOUS, POLITICAL, FRATERNAL AND VOLUNTEER ACTIVITIES
Your friends are interested in the things you've done to promote the common good.
WHERE TO SEND CONTRIBUTIONS
Name the institutions you want to receive memorial contributions.
YOUR OBITUARY: IT'S ONE OF A KIND!
Now, while you're alive, start writing your own obituary. Do your best to make your story interesting. Don't fill it with dull dates and statistics. You've lived a colorful and exciting life. People want to read about it! The best obituary is the one you write yourself because:
It's your personal record of your importance.
It enables you to be as creative as you wish.
It can include humor and special-interest stories only you know.
It reveals your true self.
The obituary process starts with a statement about your birth and death (month, day, year), followed by a cause of death (if you want). From that point, you're on your own.




You may choose to run your obituary in the local newspaper. For sure, include your obituary in the funeral or memorial service bulletin and, email it to your lists.
You have just reviewed several suggestions to consider when you ask yourself that question, "Should I write my own obituary"?, give them some very serious thought.

Loading...

When autoplay is enabled, a suggested video will automatically play next.

Up next


to add this to Watch Later

Add to

Loading playlists...