Loading...

"Carolina in the Morning" (Al Jolson, 1947)

299,383 views

Loading...

Loading...

Loading...

Rating is available when the video has been rented.
This feature is not available right now. Please try again later.
Published on Oct 16, 2008

Al Jolson's amazing comeback following World War Two was a tribute to his enormous talent and energy--even into his '60's. His second recording of "Carolina" outsold his first (from the Twenties) by a hefty margin.

CAROLINA IN THE MORNING

Nothing could be finer than to be in Carolina
In the morning
No one could be sweeter than my sweetie when I meet her
In the morning,
Where the morning glories
Wind around the door
Whispering pretty stories
I long to hear once more.

Strolling with my girly where the dew is pearly early
In the morning.
Butterflies all flutter up and kiss each little buttercup
At dawning.
If I had Aladdin's lamp for only a day
I'd make a wish and here's what I'd say:
Nothing could be finer than to be in Carolina
In the morning!

Where the morning glories
Wind around the door
Whispering pretty stories
I long to hear once more.

Strolling with my girly where the dew is pearly early
In the morning.
Butterflies all flutter up and kiss each little buttercup
At dawning.
If I had Aladdin's lamp for only a day
I'd make a wish and here's what I'd say:
Nothing could be finer than to be in Carolina
In the morning!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From Wiki:

"Carolina in the Morning" is a popular song with words by Gus Kahn and music by Walter Donaldson, first published in 1922 by Jerome H. Remick & Co.
Sheet music cover with Ben Bernie & His Orchestra
Sheet music cover with Ben Bernie & His Orchestra

The song debuted in the Broadway musical revue The Passing Show of 1922 at the Winter Garden Theater

by William Frawley[citation needed] (who later sang it on an episode of I Love Lucy), where it generated moderate attention, being rather overshadowed by other parts of the elaborate risque revue. Vaudeville performers incorporated it into their acts and helped popularize it, and the song soon became a Tin Pan Alley hit.

Notable recordings when the song was new were made by such artists as Marion Harris, Van & Schenck, and Al Jolson.

"Carolina in the Morning" gradually became a standard, being regularly revived as a popular number into the 1950s. Al Jolson's 1947 re-recording of the number outsold the original.

Other artists to have later hits with the number included Bing Crosby, Dean Martin, Jimmy Durante, Dinah Shore, Judy Garland, and Danny Kaye. In 1957, Bill Haley & His Comets recorded a rock and roll version.
... * It is unclear from the song itself whether "Carolina" refers to North Carolina or South Carolina, or (for a more risque interpretation) a woman named Carolina. The song has been used in public celebrations in both states from time to time. * Among the more colorful renditions of this song was in the Warner Bros. cartoon Book Revue (1946) in which Daffy Duck sings a Russian-accented version, imitating a then famous Danny Kaye characterization, saying "feener", "Caroleena", etc., while wearing a zoot suit. * The song frequently has been a favorite of collegiate a cappella singing groups, such as Colgate University's Colgate Thirteen. * The song was also recorded by Brent Spiner on his 1991 album Ol' Yellow Eyes Is Back. * Phish has performed this song live more than a handful of times. A Cappella style

Loading...

When autoplay is enabled, a suggested video will automatically play next.

Up next


to add this to Watch Later

Add to

Loading playlists...