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Ancient Wisdom & Mythologies with John Lash

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Published on Aug 3, 2013

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A lifelong student of world mythology and the pre-Christian Mysteries, John Lash discussed the ancient Gnostic texts known as the Nag Hammadi, as well as the Gaia Hypothesis, Archons, origins, and calendars. In studying ancient cultures such as those of Egypt, he realized their astronomical and building knowledge stemmed from inner resources rather than technology, and many of their myths were based around an interface between the sky and the human mind.

The Archons, referred to in the Nag Hammadi, are inorganic entities that preceded humankind and live off planet. They can interact deceptively with humans as mind parasites, in a manner that is similar to reports of ET encounters and abductions, he detailed. Yet, there are also said to be benevolent Archons who defected from the main group, and live in the atmosphere of the sun. Known as "paralemptors," they may play a role in receiving people when they die, Lash said.

He sees 2012 as a horizon point for the end of the great 26,000-year cosmic cycle of precession, but according to his research, the actual end date for this cycle doesn't arrive until 2216. In speaking about Earth's origin, he shared an account from the Nag Hammadi texts, about how a power spike exists in the center of our galaxy, and from there a plume shot out into the galactic limb where our solar system is located. This plume or "serpent of light" was the living entity known as Sophia, who willed the Earth into being. Lash also discussed his work adapting some of Jack Kerouac's novels into screenplays, including the Harry Potter-like Doctor Sax.

Biography:

Author and teacher John Lash is one of the foremost exponents of the power of myth to direct and shape an individual's life, as well as history itself. John is a lifelong student of world mythology, Tantra, Buddhism, Gnosticism, the pre-Christian Mysteries, alchemy, astrology, and naked-eye astronomy. He has traveled widely throughout the world and has lived in Japan, the UK, Greece, France, Spain and Belgium.

John's published works include The Seeker's Handbook: The Complete Guide to Spiritual Pathfinding, Twins and the Double, The Hero: Manhood and Power, and Quest for the Zodiac. John is co-founder and principal author of Metahistory.org, sponsored by the Marion Institute. In addition, John founded the Institute for Creative Mythology in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Wikipedia
Comparative mythology is the comparison of myths from different cultures in an attempt to identify shared themes and characteristics.[1] Comparative mythology has served a variety of academic purposes. For example, scholars have used the relationships between different myths to trace the development of religions and cultures, to propose common origins for myths from different cultures, and to support various psychological theories.

Approaches to comparative mythology

Comparative mythologists come from various fields, including folklore, anthropology, history, linguistics, and religious studies, and they have used a variety of methods to compare myths. These are some important approaches to comparative mythology.

The dying god

Many myths feature a god who dies and often returns to life. Such myths are particularly common in Near Eastern mythologies. The anthropologist Sir James Frazer compared these "dying god" myths in his multi-volume work The Golden Bough. The Egyptian god Osiris and the Mesopotamian god Tammuz are examples of the "dying god", while the Greek myths of Adonis (though a mortal) has often been compared to Osiris and the myth of Dionysos also features death and rebirth. Some scholars have noted similarities between polytheistic stories of "dying gods" and the Christian story of Jesus of Nazareth. Awareness of these similarities goes back to the early Christian era, when the church father Justin Martyr discussed them.


See Also Joseph Campbell Georges Dumezil Mircea Eliade Hamlet's Mill Carl Gustav Jung Claude Lévi-Strauss Friedrich Max Müller Eliphas Lévi Helena Petrovna Blavatsky Samael Aun Weor Mythography Religious pluralism Abram Smythe Palmer Structuralism

Fields of study Creation myth Development of religion Myth and ritual Panbabylonism

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