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GREEK PRONUNCIATION 2 (Phonetics)

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Published on Mar 13, 2013

Greek alphabet, sounds, and listening and reading exercises according to the historical Greek pronunciation (HGP). Music by songwriter Panos Zachariou.

This video is based on parts of a Workbook and sound CD titled,
READING AND PRONOUNCING BIBLICAL GREEK Vol. II: ORTHOGRAPHY AND PHONETICS (by Philemon Zachariou, Ph.D.).

Visit www.Greeklinguistics.net or contact the author at NTGreek@att.net.

See also the video, GREEK PRONUNCIATION 1 (Historical Development — Revised) at:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aI2WJ...
or the older (and longer) version of the same at:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LAxzL...

Note:
The spelling errors we see in private classical inscriptions are repeated in the numerous Hellenistic and Byzantine papyrical records as well as in modern writings by the less literate private citizens. This unbroken 2,500-year-old record of misspellings, judged by the same standard—the same 24-letter alphabet and orthography—is the strongest evidence we have of the development of the historical sounds of Greek. This record helps us follow the phonemic pronunciation of mainstream Greek that prevailed through the centuries over all other peripheral pronunciations and evolved into what it is today. Neohellenic (aka "Modern" Greek) therefore preserves the still-living historical sounds with a pronunciation that is real, consistent, and euphonic. As the direct descendant of Κοινή, Neohellenic is naturally closer to the pronunciation of the first Greek-speaking Christians than any "reconstructed" or other artificial pronunciation of Greek. —PZ

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