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Valmiki's shloka, and conversation with Brahma

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Published on Feb 26, 2009

The scene now moves to Valmiki, who having written the Ramayan upto Rama's rajyabhishek, is now hesitant to write further, since he has a premonition of the tragedy that's about to befall Rama & Sita, and wants to use the powers of his tapas to prevent it from happening. Narada suggests that he go to the River Tamsa and bathe there, so that his soul is cleansed like the river itself. There, he witnesses the killing of the Kraucha birds, and that inspires his curse on the Nishada hunter that takes the form of a shlokha, thereby giving the verse its first formative definition.

Brahma meets Valmiki later, and he tells Valmiki:

To read Ramayana one has to be above emotions; he (Brahma) says that he may change the story of Ramayan but will the society and future hold this decision of Valmiki suitable and correct??

The life on earth is not very easy and veiling or avoiding truth is neither a way of life nor any service is rendered to the society. The life on earth is full of (harsh) realities with a mixture of good and bad ; for every loving pair of birds there's a hunter!

And by changing the story /giving Ramayan a different turning point will not do any good; Write it as it is.

Brahma also reveals to him that the curse that he uttered was in the form of a slokha, which would be the basic formative definition of the verses used to write the Ramayan.

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