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Elisabeth Söderström: The complete "6 romances Op. 38" (Rachmaninov)

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Published on May 18, 2014

6 romances (Op. 38):
I. Noch′yu v sadu u menya 00:00
II. K ney 01:49
III. Margaritki 04:27
IV. Krysolov 07:00
V. Son 09:55
VI. A-u! 13:21

Rachmaninov, Sergiej (1873-1943) -composer
Elisabeth Söderström -soprano
Vladimir Ashkenazy -piano

Playlist: The art of Russian song: Glinka, Mussorgsky, Rachmaninov, Tchaikovsky...: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...

Scores:
I. http://javanese.imslp.info/files/imgl...
II. http://petrucci.mus.auth.gr/imglnks/u...
III. http://javanese.imslp.info/files/imgl...
IV. http://javanese.imslp.info/files/imgl...
V. http://javanese.imslp.info/files/imgl...
VI. http://conquest.imslp.info/files/imgl...

Until Sergey Rachmaninov left Russia after the Revolution in 1917, he was a prolific songwriter. Once in the West, Rachmaninov had to concentrate on piano playing to make a living. Aside from the Three Russian Songs for Chorus of 1926, these beautiful and romantic songs are the last of his total of 85. The Six Poems, Op. 38, show that when this unfortunate cessation happened, Rachmaninov was at the top of his form as a vocal composer. The songs achieve a unique synthesis of his powerful style of keyboard writing and sensitive, informed composition technique for voice. Moreover, Rachmaninov's taste in poetry was rapidly improving, thanks to the intervention of an idolizing fan. Marietta Shaginian, age 25 and a poetess, started writing to the composer in 1912, signing her letters simply "Re." Their correspondence became open and intense, two creative artists baring their creative souls. Soon, Shaginian felt able to criticize Rachmaninov's selection of poems to set as songs, telling the composer he relied too much on works of deceased poets and even then often used weaker ones. Shaginian introduced him to the works of the living poets of the Symbolist school of poetry. This was a movement particularly strong in France and Russia, and oddly influenced by American Edgar Allan Poe. Their poems tended to use objects as triggers for emotional reminiscence.
Rachmaninov responded by making his use of harmonies and tonality more subtle and colorful, adding a layer of chord-based symbolism. The first poem, At night in my garden (Noch'yu v sadu u menya), has delicate piano figures to suggest the warm, sad night of Alexander Blok's translation of a poem by the Armenian Avetik Isaakian. To Her (K Ney) has a text by Byely. Rich harmonies reminiscent of Isle of the Dead depict the poem's final realization that love is lost. Daisies (Margaritki) by Severyanin is one of the composer's best-known songs, with a sparkling pianistic accompaniment. The Pied-Piper is a possible title for Bryusov's poem Krysolov, which literally means "rat catcher." This has an infectious rhythm and crisp, staccato piano playing. There is an improvisatory quality to the fifth song, a setting of a poem by Sologub. Its title, Son, is probably best translated as "Sleep," although sometimes "Dream" is seen. It is soft-textured with a lulling, rippling accompaniment. Finally comes a poem called Au! by Konstantin Balmont. Sometimes called "The Quest," the Russian title is simply a cry of pain that bursts out in the last line when, again, one's love cannot be found. The outburst brings out Rachmaninov's powerful keyboard idiom, which asks a lot of the singer to match it on the concert platform

Source: http://www.allmusic.com/composition/s...

Buy the CD here: http://www.amazon.com/Rachmaninov-Son...

  • Category

  • Song

    • 1. Nochyu v sadu u menya
  • Artist

    • Elisabeth Söderström, Vladimir Ashkenazy
  • Licensed to YouTube by

    • UMG (on behalf of Decca)
  • Song

    • 2. K ney
  • Artist

    • Elisabeth Söderström, Vladimir Ashkenazy
  • Licensed to YouTube by

    • UMG (on behalf of Decca)
  • Song

    • 3. Margaritki
  • Artist

    • Elisabeth Söderström, Vladimir Ashkenazy
  • Licensed to YouTube by

    • UMG (on behalf of Decca), and 2 Music Rights Societies
  • Song

    • 4. Krysolov
  • Artist

    • Elisabeth Söderström, Vladimir Ashkenazy
  • Licensed to YouTube by

    • UMG (on behalf of Decca), and 2 Music Rights Societies
  • Song

    • 5. Son
  • Artist

    • Elisabeth Söderström, Vladimir Ashkenazy
  • Licensed to YouTube by

    • UMG (on behalf of Decca), and 3 Music Rights Societies
  • Song

    • 6. Au!
  • Artist

    • Elisabeth Söderström, Vladimir Ashkenazy
  • Licensed to YouTube by

    • UMG (on behalf of Decca)

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