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Understanding the Universe The Cosmological Theory

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Published on Jul 20, 2013

Expert in space computational technology, Scott Tyson, has been an advisor to the office of the Secretary of Defense. He presented his cosmological theory, and argued that many accepted scientific notions or paradoxes about the universe are wrong.

According to Tyson, the universe is neither contracting or expanding, the Big Bang didn't happen, and multiverses don't exist. Space-time is neither created or destroyed but is a constant, and the observer plays a crucial role in the perception of this, he continued.

Tyson suggests that all physical phenomena obeys what he calls the "Unity Expression," an underlying relationship in which space-time is conserved. From this, he has construed the physical basis for gravity, and how it can be produced and used as a new, free source of energy.

Biography:

Visionary physicist, engineer, scientist, researcher and inventor Scott M. Tyson has dedicated most of his 30-year career to probing the far-reaching mysteries of the universe, boldly venturing where few men dare to tread and forever changing how people view the world around them. And he has 15 patents in space technology to prove it. After graduating from Johns Hopkins University with an engineering degree, he began his trailblazing career at IBM's VLSI Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories and Westinghouse's Advanced Technology Laboratory.

Responsible for the implementation of new microelectronics approaches, Tyson also served as an advisor to the Office of the Secretary of Defense on space computing technology development and planning, as well as for congressional delegations to accelerate the advancement of meaningful and effective space electronic solutions. His remarkable ability to integrate seemingly disparate concepts and insights into meaningful and practical solutions and contexts ultimately led to a second career as an author.

Wikipedia
The Universe is commonly defined as the totality of existence, including planets, stars, galaxies, the contents of intergalactic space, and all matter and energy.Definitions and usage vary[how?] and similar terms include the cosmos, the world and nature.

Scientific observation of the Universe, which is believed to be at least 93 billion light years in diameter, has led to inferences of its earlier stages. These observations suggest that the Universe has been governed by the same physical laws and constants throughout most of its extent and history. The Big Bang theory is the prevailing cosmological model that describes the early development of the Universe, which in physical cosmology is believed to have occurred about 13.7 billion years ago.

There are various multiverse hypotheses, in which physicists have suggested that the Universe might be one among many universes that likewise exist. The farthest distance that it is theoretically possible for humans to see is described as the observable Universe. Observations have shown that the Universe appears to be expanding at an accelerating rate, and a number of models have arisen to predict its ultimate fate.

Throughout recorded history, several cosmologies and cosmogonies have been proposed to account for observations of the Universe. The earliest quantitative geocentric models were developed by the ancient Greek philosophers. Over the centuries, more precise observations and improved theories of gravity led to Copernicus's heliocentric model and the Newtonian model of the Solar System, respectively. Further improvements in astronomy led to the realization that the Solar System is embedded in a galaxy composed of billions of stars, the Milky Way, and that other galaxies exist outside it, as far as astronomical instruments can reach. Careful studies of the distribution of these galaxies and their spectral lines have led to much of modern cosmology. Discovery of the red shift and cosmic microwave background radiation suggested that the Universe is expanding and had a beginning.

According to the prevailing scientific model of the Universe, known as the Big Bang, the Universe expanded from an extremely hot, dense phase called the Planck epoch, in which all the matter and energy of the observable Universe was concentrated. Since the Planck epoch, the Universe has been expanding to its present form, possibly with a brief period (less than 10−32 seconds) of cosmic inflation. Several independent experimental measurements support this theoretical expansion and, more generally, the Big Bang theory. Recent observations indicate that this expansion is accelerating because of dark energy, and that most of the matter in the Universe may be in a form which cannot be detected by present instruments, called dark matter.

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