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The Swim S1 • E4

How Millions of Microscopic Fibers Are Ending Up in Our Bodies | The Swim

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Published on Nov 5, 2018

Every day, billions of sharp, invisible fibers are making their way out to our oceans and air, and into our water, wine, beer, and cells.

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How much plastic is your washing machine sending out to sea?
https://www.vox.com/the-goods/2018/9/...
"It’s no secret that too many of the plastic products we use end up in the ocean. But you might not be aware of one major source of that pollution: our clothes.
Polyester, nylon, acrylic, and other synthetic fibers — all of which are forms of plastic — are now about 60 percent of the material that makes up our clothes worldwide. Synthetic plastic fibers are cheap and extremely versatile, providing for stretch and breathability in athleisure, and warmth and sturdiness in winter clothes."

Will clothes companies do the right thing to reduce microfiber pollution?
https://www.theguardian.com/sustainab...
"Over the past few years, evidence has been mounting that synthetic textiles such as polyester and acrylic, which make up much of our clothing, are a major source of pollution in the world’s oceans. That’s because washing those clothes causes tiny plastic fibers to shed and travel through wastewater treatment plants into public waterways. These microfibers are sometimes inadvertently gobbled up by aquatic organisms, including the fish that end up on our plate."

15 Ways to Stop Microfiber Pollution Now
https://www.plasticpollutioncoalition...
"Think about all your clothing made of acrylic, nylon, and polyester. Yes, that means fleece, trousers, blouses, socks, and even your beloved yoga pants. Did you know? Every time you wash these synthetic fabrics, millions of microfibers are released into the water. Microfibers are too small to be filtered out by waste treatment plants, so they end up in our waterways and oceans, where they wreak havoc on marine animals and the environment.
Plastic fibers are now showing up in fish and shellfish sold in in California and Indonesia for human consumption. And one paper showed that microfibers are responsible for 85 percent of shoreline pollution across the globe. How can we stop this pollution?"

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