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9/11: Canada is life-blinding itself: Canadian philosopher McMurtry

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Published on Jul 8, 2007

JOHN McMURTRY (part 2) In Sept. 2000, the PNAC published an article which observed that the "process of transformation...is likely to be a long one, absent some catastrophic and catalyzing event -- like a new Pearl Harbor." The principal author of that article was Thomas Donnelly, who shortly after 9/11 went to work for Lockheed Martin.

In part 2 of this series, Professor John McMurtry explains why 9/11 happened when it did, and calls attention to Canadian media cover-up of the crime which accepts and promotes the implausible conspiracy theory. Illustrating the restrictions on public debate in Canada, McMurtry recalls the March 18, 2003 CBC TV debate between himself and Thomas Donnelly, who's identified as a PNAC founder and AEI "fellow." To charges that Donnelly was advocating war crimes by calling for and planning for the invasion of Iraq, Donnelly offers this mantra-like defense, "The use of American power in the world has been, as a matter of practical and historical fact, the sole reliable instrument, first of all, for bringing peace and stability and freedom to the European continent. Secondly, we hope now to do the same sort of thing in Iraq."

Within the media, the upshot of this debate was that the CBC producer who brought McMurtry on the program was fired, demoted out. Word of such corporate response gets around quickly and self-censorship tends to follow. Official media contributes to the life-blinding of the public, and itself. (Part 3 concludes with a structural analysis of the structural analysts). 10 min. snowshoefilms yoryevrah

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