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Replacing your Thermostat.WMV

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Published on Jul 18, 2010

Replacing your Thermostat on Izusu Rodeo 1997­: The thermostat is a component of your cars cooling system. Its function is to regulate temperature and keep it at an ideal level.

The thermostat is nothing more than a valve. Usually it is located at the top of the engine in the thermostat housing which is sometimes called the water outlet. If you follow the upper radiator hose back from the radiator to the engine, you'll most likely find that the end of the hose is clamped to the thermostat housing. Inside the housing you will find the thermostat.

The job of the thermostat is to control engine coolant temperature, thus regulating the engine's operating temperature itself. The way this is accomplished is by the opening and closing of the thermostat. One side of the thermostat rests inside the intake manifold; it's here that the thermostat reacts to the temperature of the engine coolant.

When a car is first started the thermostat would be closed to prevent flow of coolant throughout the cooling system. This enables the engine to reach operating temperature more quickly because the coolant in the engine is heating up more rapidly due to its restriction by the thermostat. Once the engine reaches the desired operating temperature the thermostat opens and allows the coolant to flow throughout the cooling system. Once the fluid starts circulating it flows through the radiator where it is cooled down before returning to the engine block. This process prevents the engine from overheating.

The opening and closing action of the thermostat is accomplished by the expansion or constriction of a spring that is part of the thermostat. Since the thermostat is surrounded by the engine coolant, the spring reacts to the coolant temperature causing the part to open or close.

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