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The Tomb of the Great Martyr St. George the Dragon Slayer, In Lod (Lydda), Israel

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Published on Aug 13, 2012

Zahi Shaked A tour guide in Israel and his camera
zahigo25@walla.com 972-54-6905522 tel




סיור עם מורה הדרך ומדריך הטיולים צחי שקד 0546905522

Saint George (c. 275/281 -- 23 April 303) was, according to tradition, a Roman soldier from Syria Palaestina and a soldier in the Guard of Diocletian, who is venerated as a Christian martyr. In hagiography Saint George is one of the most venerated saints in the Catholic (Western and Eastern Rites), Anglican, Eastern Orthodox, and the Oriental Orthodox churches. He is immortalized in the tale of Saint George and the Dragon and is one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers. His memorial is celebrated on 23 April, and he is regarded as one of the most prominent military saints.
Many Patronages of Saint George exist around the world, including: Georgia, England, Egypt, Bulgaria, Aragon, Catalonia, Romania, Ethiopia, Greece, India, Iraq, Lithuania, Palestine, Portugal, Serbia, Ukraine and Russia, as well as the cities of Genoa, Amersfoort, Beirut, Botoşani, Drobeta Turnu-Severin, Timişoara, Fakiha, Bteghrine, Cáceres, Ferrara, Freiburg, Kragujevac, Kumanovo, Ljubljana, Pérouges, Pomorie, Preston, Qormi, Rio de Janeiro, Lod, Lviv, Barcelona, Moscow, Tamworth and Victoria, as well as of the Scout Movement[3] and a wide range of professions, organizations and disease sufferers.
The Church of Saint George (Arabic: كنيسة القديس جيورجوس or كنيسة مار جريس‎ Hebrew: כנסיית ג'ורג' הקדוש קוטל הדרקון) is the major shrine for the fourth century martyr Saint George (الخضر Al-Khidr in Arabic) and is located in Lod, Israel.[1] The current church, built in 1870, shares space with the El-Khidr Mosque.
Toward the end of the nineteenth century, the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Jerusalem received permission from the Ottoman authorities to build a church on the site of a previous basilica. The church is built over an earlier 15th century AD structure, and occupies the north end of the nave and left-hand aisle of the earlier church, from which there survive two apses - which, contrary to the normal rule, face north rather than east.
The Ottoman authorities stipulated, that part of the plot be made available for a mosque. Consequently the current Church of St. George incorporates only the northeast corner of the Byzantine basilica. The prayer hall of the adjacent mosque contains a column that once stood in the nave of the basilica. The church contains the sarcophagus of St George.

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