Loading...

BEE DEATHS IN FRANCE 1.divx

6,085 views

Loading...

Loading...

Loading...

Rating is available when the video has been rented.
This feature is not available right now. Please try again later.
Published on May 2, 2012

PART ONE - OF FOUR VIDEOS
In 1992 Bayer was granted a license to use its systemic insecticide 'Gaucho' on Sunflowers and Maize in France. Sunflowers were massively important to the French bee-farmers since the honey derived from them amounted to something like 30,000 tonnes annually. In 1994 more than 400,000 bee-colonies died within days of the sunflowers blooming; the beekeepers could actually watch bees dying on the sunflowers - as soon as they had drunk the nectar and collected the pollen. The ground beneath the sunflowers was 'crunchy' with dead bees - and the hives were soon empty apart from the queen and a few nurse bees. The only new factor in the environment was that the sunflowers had been treated with'Gaucho' and its constituent insecticide Imidacloprid. The beekeepers lobbied the govt. to carry out urgent research; the facts were quickly known - the pollen and nectar contained imidacloprid - a neuro-toxic insecticide - and the bees were being poisoned: acutely and sub-lethally.
However, the government refused to act; the regulators refused to act; the food safety agency refused to act - despite overwhelming scientific evidence that imidacloprid was the direct cause of the mass-bee-kill. Eventually - after three years of mass bee deaths - the beekeepers marched on Paris; the Minister of Agriculture banned the use of Imidacloprid on sunflowers and maize. The ban was enacted in 2000AD - but the British and American governments - along with their scientists and regulators have completely ignored the French evidence and experience. More than 4 million bee colonies have died in America since 2006; nobody knows how many have died in the UK.

Loading...

When autoplay is enabled, a suggested video will automatically play next.

Up next


to add this to Watch Later

Add to

Loading playlists...