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BARTA - Horse Behaviour at Incidents - Gemma Pearson

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Published on Apr 27, 2016

Horse behaviour at incidents, creating a casualty centred rescue, minimising stress and maximising safety and welfare

Horse are large, powerful animals with a strong fear response, this usually makes them the most dangerous aspect of a rescue scenario.
They are also often described as being unpredictable although with training people can be trained to predict equine behaviour much more accurately and so predict when the horse is liable to react aversely.
Like other mammals horses learn through classical and operant conditioning. By understanding these processes they can be applied within a rescue scenario to reduce the likelihood of aversive reactions from the horse. The result is a safer and less stressful rescue for all the stakeholders involved.
Example
Negative reinforcement describes the process of learning when behaviour is rewarded by the removal of something mildly aversive, hence it is often called removal reinforcement. Consider a horse loose on a motorway each time a person approaches to catch the horse it flees thus removing the perceived pressure of the person. However if the person stops on the edge of the flight zone and steps back before the horse moves the behaviour being rewarded is standing still. Usually within a few moments the person can approach close enough to catch the horse without it fleeing.

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