Loading...

UNTITLED (estamos hasta la madre), 2011

2,965 views

Loading...

Loading...

Loading...

Rating is available when the video has been rented.
This feature is not available right now. Please try again later.
Uploaded on May 15, 2011

This video addresses the direct relationship between U.S. drug consumption and the progressive, rapid destruction of Mexican communities, both urban and rural. This destruction includes the murders of almost 40,000 people (at the time of this upload) in just a few years, including many men, women and children who weren't involved in narco / drug trafficking. In their bloody battles over drug trade routes into the U.S., drug cartels have successfully dismantled communities, destroyed local economies and have paralyzed vast geographies of the country with terror and intimidation. Many people avoid leaving their houses after dark, turning cities and villages into ghost towns, especially at night. The terrorists are also killing Mexico's tourist trade. U.S. colleges, particularly in states bordering Mexico, now routinely issue advisory warnings urging students to not travel to Mexico.

With every line of coke, with every bump of meth, with the abundance of weed consumed in the U.S., etc., there's a much bigger picture at stake that needs to be an increasing part of our daily conversations and consciousness, even amongst those who consider themselves "conscious."




Linked here is Mexican poet / journalist Javier Sicilia's Open Letter to Mexico's Politicians and Criminals, which he published just after the assassination of his 24 year old son, Juan Francisco. Javier Sicilia has been organizing protest marches in Mexico in an effort to organize people who have had enough and who wish to end the slaughter.

http://www.narconews.com/Issue67/arti...

and a short piece from NPR: http://www.npr.org/2011/05/06/1360630...

This video was constructed almost entirely from pre-existing imagery and sound culled from the Internet, in addition to a few images from Alarma!, a decades old tabloid published in Mexico. It was intentionally constructed in this manner to illustrate that these images are instantly accessible to anyone with Internet access with little or no digging or research. It speaks to a bigger picture in the pursuit to get high.

Comments are disabled for this video.
When autoplay is enabled, a suggested video will automatically play next.

Up next


to add this to Watch Later

Add to

Loading playlists...