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JOHNNY HORTON- "THE BATTLE OF NEW ORLEANS" (W/LYRICS)

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Published on Apr 28, 2013

Posted from an old LP. This was a million-selling #1 in 1959. "John Gale "Johnny" Horton (April 30, 1925 -- November 5, 1960) was an American country music and rockabilly singer most famous for his semi-folk, so-called "saga songs" which began the "historical ballad" craze of the late 1950s and early 1960s. With them, he had several major successes, most notably in 1959 with the song "The Battle of New Orleans" (written by Jimmy Driftwood), which was awarded the 1960 Grammy Award for Best Country & Western Recording. The song was awarded the Grammy Hall of Fame Award, and in 2001 ranked No. 333 of the Recording Industry Association of America's "Songs of the Century".
During 1960, Horton had two other successes with "North to Alaska" for John Wayne's movie, North to Alaska, and "Sink the Bismarck". Horton is a member of the Rockabilly Hall of Fame, Horton will be remembered for his major contribution to both country and rockabilly music. When Johnny Cash, a good friend of Horton's, learned about the accident he said, "[I] locked myself in one of the hotel's barrooms and cried. Sometime before Horton's death in a car accident he telephoned Johnny Cash for a chat. Cash declined to accept the call, an omission he regretted until the day he died. "The Battle of New Orleans" is a song written by Jimmy Driftwood. The song describes the 1815 Battle of New Orleans from the perspective of an American soldier; the song tells the tale of the battle with a light tone and provides a rather comical version of what actually happened at the battle. It has been recorded by many artists, but the singer most often associated with this song is Johnny Horton. His version scored number 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1959 (see 1959 in music).
In Billboard magazine's rankings of the top songs in the first fifty years of the Billboard Hot 100 chart, "The Battle of New Orleans" was ranked as the twenty-eighth song overall and the number-one country music song to appear on the chart. The melody is based on a well-known American fiddle tune "The 8th of January", which was the date of the Battle of New Orleans. Jimmy Driftwood, a school principal in Arkansas with a passion for history, set an account of the battle to this music in an attempt to get students interested in learning history. It seemed to work, and Driftwood became well known in the region for his historical songs. He was "discovered" in the late 1950s by Don Warden, and eventually was given a recording contract by RCA, for whom he recorded 12 songs in 1958, including "The Battle of New Orleans"." (Wikipedia)
LYRICS: (Jimmie Driftwood)
In eighteen-fourteen we took a little trip
Along with Colonel Jackson down the mighty Mississipp'
We took a little bacon and we took a little beans
And we caught the bloody British in the town of New Orleans.
Chorus:
We fired our guns and the British kept on comin'
There wasn't neigh as many as there was a while ago
We fired once more and they began to runnin'
On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico.
We looked down the river and we seen the British come
And there must have been a hundred of 'em beatin on the drum
They stepped so high and they made their bugles ring
We stood behind our cotton bales and didn't say a thing.
Chorus:
We fired our guns and the British kept on comin'
There wasn't neigh as many as there was a while ago
We fired once more and they began to runnin'
On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico.
Ol' Hickory said we could take 'em by surprise
If we didn't fire our muskets 'til we looked 'em in the eyes
We held our fire 'til we seen their faces well
Then we opened up our squirrel guns and really gave em, well.
Chorus:
We fired our guns and the British kept on comin'
There wasn't neigh as many as there was a while ago
We fired once more and they began to runnin'
On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico.
Yeah, they ran through the briars and they ran through the brambles
And they ran through the bushes where a rabbit couldn't go.
They ran so fast that the hounds couldn't catch 'em
Down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico.
We fired our cannon 'til the barrel melted down
Then we grabbed an alligator and we fought another round
We filled his head with cannonballs and powered his behind
And when we touched the powder off the 'gator lost his mind.
Chorus:
We fired our guns and the British kept on comin'
There wasn't neigh as many as there was a while ago
We fired once more and they began to runnin'
On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico.
They ran through the briars and they ran through the brambles
And they ran through the bushes where a rabbit couldn't go
They ran so fast that the hounds couldn't catch 'em
A down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico.
(Spoken)
Hut, two, three, four
Sound off, three, four
Hut, two, three, four
Sound off, three, four...

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