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Kolya Derevenko's Nightmare

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Published on Mar 14, 2009

Kolya Derevenko's Nightmare
Kolya was interviewed sometime in the 1990's, as part of a promotion for the release of Romanovy: Ventsenosnaya Sem'ya, in 2003.

Rough translation: I was a little boy, just 12 years old. I didn't know anything about the evil in people's soul. We were living at the Popov house, nearby the Ipatiev house. In the middle of the summer of 1918, I was afraid and worry for Alexei. I wanted to see him and at the same time I'm sure, he wanted to see me. Until that sad day of July 17, 1918. My father, Gilliard, Gibbes and others knew everything, but I knew nothing. Something terrible was going to happen, but I didn't know what... In the last week of July 1918, Me, my father, Gilliard, Gibbes, etc. entered the Ipatiev house. A terrible scene there... The house was in complete chaos; diaries, letters, albums, and other items were all around in the house.. "But where is Leskela?" I asked my father, but he stayed quiet. Leskela's diary was found by a White guard, I think his name was Nemetkin, I'm not sure. But Leonid Sednev... I saw him. He cried. His cry was so loud... so loud!
I was confused. "Papa, where is my Leskela?" - I asked.
"They killed him." He said, and then I started to cry.
"But how?" - I replied
"They killed the Tsar, the Tsaritsa, and the Grand Duchesses also. All are dead." - said my father.
"But I don't understand. Where... where are their bodies?"
"We don't know, maybe we'll never find them"
I then realized that life could become brutal... I found Leskela's last letter written to me. One sentence in particular in that letter - "I hug you warmly" - made me cry so much. I thought "And I hug you warmly, too, my dear friend, my tsar..." I was in shock.
The following years, I thought just about him. "Why did they killed you? In the USSR, there is no place for my Leskela. We'll be forever friends, my dear Tsesarevich... If I could see you just one more time, then I can die in peace...

Alexei and Kolya would sign their names backwards in their letters, that is why he refers to Alexei as Leskela. Kolya died in 1999 without knowing where Alexei was buried.

  • Category

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  • Album

    • Movin' Melodies
  • Writers

    • André Tanneberger
  • Licensed to YouTube by

    • [Merlin] XelonEntertainment, Kontor Records (on behalf of Kontor Records); LatinAutor, SODRAC, Sony ATV Publishing, UNIAO BRASILEIRA DE EDITORAS DE MUSICA - UBEM, and 6 Music Rights Societies

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