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C-123 Agent Orange: USAF- "Destroy Toxic Planes - Hide Evidence from Veterans"

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Published on Apr 27, 2013

Toxic C-123 fleet destroyed to prevent veterans turning to VA for medical care!

The USAF faced the necessity of destroying the remaining C-123 aircraft stored at Davis-Monthan AFB's "boneyard" due to their Agent Orange contamination. Sales and parting out were not possible and a potential $3.4 billion EPA fine was in view. DOD Agent Orange Consultant A. Young recommended destruction of the airplanes, especially because veterans (already exposed!) who'd flown the airplanes earlier might learn of the contamination, and their exposure, and turn to the VA for medical care. Young's statement clearly was to prevent veterans from proceeding on their claims, and his statement to the AF was taken up by managers at the 505th Sustainability Squadron as they sought Air Staff approval for C-123 shredding and smelting...and by repeating Young's recommendation to hide the process from the media and the veterans, it became AF policy.

It should be clear. Veterans had ALREADY been exposed. They should have been told of this when first discovered by the USAF, rather than having the evidence about it destroyed specifically to prevent their learning of the C-123 contamination history and the right...indeed, for many, the NEED to turn to the VA for medical care for exposure to deadly dioxin.

Shame on all parties involved for this "magnificent" deception. Shame on those who congratulated the players for their secrecy. Shame on the Base Public Affairs for a piece of tainted "journalism" which brings discredit to the United States Air Force!

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