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Using the TI-83/84: 8 - Matrices

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Uploaded on May 25, 2011

1 - Introduction
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JnaZ9X...

2 - Key Layout and Basic Arithmetic
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=POnWDy...

3 - Order of Operations
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WyQXeT...

4 - Menus and Functions
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R2QObV...

5 - Complex Arithmetic
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=euE1_g...

6 - Storing Values as Letters
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2dqhry...

6.1 - Basic Programming with Change of Base Formula
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VLjLzE...

7 - Basic Graphing
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FYZI_N...

7.1 - Graphing Tools: More Zooming, Finding Extrema, Solving for Zeros, Solving for Intersections (Advanced, Optional)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LW623S...

7.2 - Equation Solver (Advanced, Optional)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ZS8F6...

8 - Matrices
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7txwOb...

9 - Linear Regression, Quadratic Regression, etc. (Advanced)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=49W01Q...


This is the eighth video in my series on using the TI-83 series calculators. This video focuses on basic matrix use.

There's also another way to enter matrices on the calculator. It's a little more difficult, but faster. If you're not used to it, though, then the matrix editor will probably be faster. Notice the way the calculator returns a matrix? It's basically a list of lists. And you can input a matrix directly into the home screen in a way that's pretty close to that. The only difference is that you put commas between the individual entries. Put a bracket around the matrix and a bracket around the rows, and separate the individual entries with commas. So, the first matrix would be entered as [[4,6,2][8,2,4][1,7,3]].

Here's a function I didn't think was worth going over in the video but I might as well mention it here: the augment function. If you have two matrices that have the same number of rows, say [A] and [B], you can use "augment([A],[B])" to return a matrix with [A] on the left side and [B] on the right side.

For quick reference, here's the format of the row operations, where [M] is any matrix:

To swap row a and b: rowSwap([M],a,b)
To add rows a and b, then replacing b with the result: row+([M],a,b)
To multiply row a by a scalar (x is going to represent the scalar): √órow(x,[M],a)
To add a multiple of row a to row b, then replace row b with the result (x is going to represent what we're multiplying row a by): √órow+(x,[M],a,b)

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