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Heart of the Sunrise by Yes in 1080p HD

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Published on Jul 6, 2013

From Wikipedia:
"Heart of the Sunrise" is a progressive rock song by British band Yes. It is the closing track on their fourth album, 1971's Fragile. The compositional credits go to Jon Anderson, Bill Bruford, and Chris Squire, though keyboardist Rick Wakeman contributed some uncredited sections.

The song eventually rose to become the band's fourth most-played song. However, it was played approximately three hundred times less than "I've Seen All Good People" and received little if any airplay. It was popular enough, however, to appear on Yessongs, Classic Yes, In a Word: Yes (1969 - ), and many other studio and live retrospectives. It was named the ninth greatest drum performance by digitaldreamdoor.com."

According to Anderson, the song is about being lost in the city. This was explained on many tours. On the Big Generator tour, Anderson says that the song is about the power and energy of the sunrise. In 1978, however, he said the song was about the power of love. Sometimes, he makes other comments. For example, on the October 16, 1971 show, Anderson states that the organ in the song is inaudible and will be performed without it. He further notes that the organ is "one of the best jokes in the business."

The song begins with a churning, bass-heavy riff that alternates between 6/8 and 3/4 time (in the same way as "America" from Leonard Bernstein's score for the musical West Side Story). After one full sequence, it merges into a new, slightly funky section in 4/4 that lasts for a minute and a half. It afterwards breaks back into three full cycles of the main riff.

At around 3:25, after the final cycle, the song switches to a much softer style, where Jon Anderson begins singing. This section starts in 6/8 but includes many individual sequences, including a quirky 5/8 riff that appears in various speeds and arrangements. The song gradually builds in intensity, eventually including the main riff interspersed with the other sections. A brief classical snippet of Rick Wakeman's is used as well in both classical and rock arrangements.

The song itself ends very abruptly around 10:35, but a reprise of "We Have Heaven" from earlier on the album is included as a hidden track, extending it to 11:27 (11:32 on the 2003 release). Some vinyl pressings ended without this reprise. At either length, it is the longest song on the album.

Rick Wakeman contributed to the writing of "Heart Of The Sunrise" (and fellow album piece "South Side Of The Sky") by adding piano interludes to both songs, but wasn't credited because of contractual conflicts. He was instead promised more money by Atlantic studio executives, which he claims he never saw.


Lyrics:
Love comes to you and you follow
Lose one on to the Heart of the Sunrise
SHARP-DISTANCE
How can the wind with its arms all around me

Lost on a wave and then after
Dream on on to the Heart of the Sunrise
SHARP-DISANCE
How can the wind with so many around me
Lost in the city

Lost in their eyes as you hurry by
Counting the broken ties they decide
Love comes to you and then after
Dream on on to the Heart of the Sunrise
Lost on a wave that you're dreaming
Dream on on to the Heart of the Sunrise
SHARP-DISTANCE
How can the wind with its arms all around me
SHARP-DISTANCE
How can the wind with so many around me
I feel lost in the city

Lost in their eyes as you hurry by
Counting the broken ties they decided

Straight light moving and removing
SHARPNESS of the colour sun shine
Straight light searching all the meanings of the song
Long last treatment of the telling that
Relates to all the words sung
Dreamer easy in the chair that really fits you

Love comes to you and then after
Dream on on to the Heart of the Sunrise
SHARP-DISTANCE
How can the sun with its arms all around me
SHARP-DISTANCE
How can the wind with so many around me
I feel lost in the city

  • Category

  • Song

  • Artist

    • Yes
  • Album

    • Classic Yes
  • Writers

    • Chris Squire, Jon Anderson, Bill Bruford
  • Licensed to YouTube by

    • WMG (on behalf of Rhino Elektra); ASCAP, PEDL, Warner Chappell, CMRRA, UBEM, and 4 Music Rights Societies

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