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A Quiet Pint of Cains at the Phil in Liverpool, England

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Uploaded on Sep 27, 2011

"The price of fame is not being able to go to the Phil for a quiet pint." -- John Lennon.

The Philharmonic Dining Rooms is the name of a public house at the corner of Hope Street and Hardman Street in Liverpool, Merseyside, England, and stands diagonally opposite the Liverpool Philharmonic Hall. It is commonly known as The Phil. The public house has been designated by English Heritage as a Grade II listed building.

The public house was built in about 1898--1900 for the brewer Robert Cain. It was designed by Walter Thomas and craftsmen from the School of Architecture and Applied Arts at University College (now the University of Liverpool), supervised by G. Hall Neale and Arthur Stratton.

The story of Cain's, like the story of Liverpool, is one of passion, ambition, and graft. It takes in immigration, global trade, terrible poverty, and vast wealth. In just two generations, the Cain family went from the slums of Irish Liverpool to a seat in the House of Lords. As the city grew, so did the brewery, and as the city struggled, so Cain's fought for survival. At the height of Liverpool's fortunes, Robert Cain owned 200 public houses across Merseyside, including the world famous Philharmonic Dining Rooms -'The Phil' - which he built. City and brewery have shared the highs and lows of recent Liverpool history and the remarkable revival of Cain's by another immigrant family, the Dusanjs, in the twenty-first century is matched by the city's own recovery and reinvention. Here, then, is the story of Liverpool in a pint.

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