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An Elegant Death

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Published on May 12, 2012

Constructed in 1893 as a resort, this grand hall only served for a brief time in its original role. By 1907 it was in use as an the upper class finishing school for young women. Built of wood and stone, the structure is equal parts elegance and frailty. Intricate carvings can still be seen adorning corners and peaks, reminding passers-by that it must once have appeared a palace on its hilltop. Today, it more closely resembles the classic image of a haunted mansion, the long lines of its architecture are bowed and uneven as its windows stare blankly to the horizon.

The students here would likely have been the daughter's of industrialists, bankers and other members of society who's wealth permitted such an education. Here, young women would learn fine arts and languages, and be schooled in all the lessons of societal behavior and etiquette that would make them successful in their future roles as the wives of future bankers and industrialists.

As time progressed, such an institution began to seem more and more archaic. As the once-radical ideas of feminism became mainstream, finishing schools became a symbol of sexism and a greater number of women began attending true colleges. In the 1970's, the school made a last-ditch effort to modernize by expanding to a four year college, but the expanded curriculum only delayed its inevitable close in 1977.

Some places keep time differently from the rest of the world. Within these halls it is still an era of floor-length dresses, horseback riding, etiquette lessons and the long forgotten art of the curtsy. The very fibers of the decaying wood excrete these ideals, and cast them in long shadows across the filth covered floors. The smell of lavender and the sound of a softly played piano are almost expected, even among the damp and dimly lit hallways which have so gently replaced them.

Photos can be viewed here:
http://antiquityechoes.blogspot.com/2...

You can see more in our book "Forsaken", published by Weird NJ:
http://www.weirdnj.com/index.php?page...

Music - "Ultimo Carillon" by Ashram

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