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Johann Sebastian Bach - Partita No. 2, BWV 1004 | Hilary Hahn

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Published on Jan 9, 2013

Johann Sebastian Bach - Partita for solo violin Nº 2 in D minor, BWV 1004. 1720. Hilary Hahn, Violin, 1997.
Chaconne, Partita Nº 2, BWV 1004 http://youtu.be/QqA3qQMKueA
Violin Partita Nº 3, BWV 1006 http://youtu.be/3VOkrddp6M8
Violin Sonata Nº 3, BWV 1005 http://youtu.be/Lej1nHZBMgc

Parts/Movements
1. Allemande 00:00
2. Courante 05:13
3. Sarabande 07:22
4. Gigue 12:06
5. Chaconne 15:30 - http://youtu.be/QqA3qQMKueA

In 1999, Hahn said that she played Bach more than any other composer and that she had played solo Bach pieces every day since she was eight. "Bach is, for me, the touchstone that keeps my playing honest. Keeping the intonation pure in double stops, bringing out the various voices where the phrasing requires it, crossing the strings so that there are not inadvertent accents, presenting the structure in such a way that it's clear to the listener without being pedantic -- one can't fake things in Bach, and if one gets all of them to work, the music sings in the most wonderful way." — Hilary Hahn, Saint Paul Sunday

In a segment on NPR entitled "Musicians in Their Own Words", Hahn speaks about the surreal experience of playing the Bach Chaconne (listen here: http://youtu.be/QqA3qQMKueA from the Partita for Violin No. 2) alone on the concert stage.

Alongside Paganini's 24 Caprices for solo violin and Bach's six cello suites, his Partitas and Sonatas (three apiece) for solo violin stand out among their comparatively few siblings as magnificent music written for an unaccompanied stringed instrument. And while they also represent the zenith of polyphonic writing for a non-keyboard instrument, Bach's sonatas and partitas were also crucially important in the development of violin technique. With their colossal scope, huge technical demands, and musical complexity, and notwithstanding their awesome intellectual intensity, these creations greatly transcended anything that had preceded them, including the Partitas for solo violin by von Westhoff (1696), and various comparable solo works by Biber, Pisendel, and others. It seems most probable that either the Dresden virtuosi Pisendel or Volumier, or even more likely the Cöthen Konzertmeister Spiess, would have been the first players to attempt these exceptionally challenging works, all of which sound as if they were written for an age of instrumental virtuosity that still lay far in the future.

The sonatas are restricted to four movements (slow-fast-slow-fast, as with the early sonata da chiesa), one of which is a fugue. The Partitas are generally more extended, and of unorthodox formal design (as perhaps is implied by their more wide-ranging generic title), and by the more exploratory, improvisatory feel of the music even as they consist of sequences of Baroque dances. The awesome and eloquent Partita No. 2 in D minor, BWV 1004, seems for the most part to follow the conventional outline of the Baroque suite, opening with an earnest and purposeful Allemanda unexpectedly free of chordal multiple-stopping. There follow a Corrente and a Sarabanda, whose brief coda furnishes the link with the succeeding Giga.

However, this work concludes with the most labyrinthine and intellectually powerful single movement ever devised for an unaccompanied string instrument. This is Bach's famous Chaconne (originally "Ciaccona"), a colossal arched series of 64 stunning variants upon the stark, open-ended four-measure phrase heard at the beginning. Two monumental outer sections in the minor enclose a major-key central episode, and this great structure encompasses every aspect of violin-playing technique and contrapuntal ingenuity that would have been known in Bach's day. The Chaconne, whose duration exceeds 15 minutes (and is thus longer than the rest of the work put together) is often performed as a free-standing movement and has also been widely transcribed for other instruments.

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