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Eric Lilljequist

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Uploaded on May 23, 2007

Latv music special Eric's musical orientation began when he was eight years old, living outside of Boston with his family. His mother, a music and piano fanatic, bought him his first guitar. Encouraged by his parents to learn all he could about music, Eric jumped into it with both feet. "I never had a bad scene with my parents about music, and besides, there was nothing else that really interested me. The thing came along and carried me away. I formed a band at 12, and we played all the Top 40 hits. I learned all the arrangements, took charge and taught the rest of the band. "My mother loves music - she plays it all the time, particularly rag-time piano. My uncle was a bluegrass banjo player who played a few dates professionally but nothing serious. My father played harmonica but he was usually too busy keeping the rest of the family together. We had a summer house about 220 miles from Boston on an island off Maine where I lived about three years. Before that, I'd been into folk music, but living up there brought me into the country feeling. And, of course, I was very influenced by the Beatles."

At 24 Eric was involved in the now classic Boston band, Orphan, along with fellow guitarist and harmonizer, Dean Adrien and Jonathan Edwards, who later penned "Sunshine Go Away Today" and went on to national stardom. Eric's songwriting took off and their first album was entirely his own works. Overflowing with creative ideas, he began writing songs for other artists as well, most notably Jonathan Edwards and Bruce MacPherson. His song "Have Yourself a Good Time for Me" could, and should have been a major hit on the Country charts with it's Byrds/Burrito Brothers twang and catchy hooks. Eric became a popular back-up singer for Edwards and later Tom Rush.

With his current trio or as a solo performer there is none better. To hear Eric's songs arranged and sung by Eric himself is sheer joy. His voice is reminiscent of Van Morrison and Boz Scaggs but is pure Eric in the end. And whether he's playing acoustic or electric, his guitar work is first rate. To see him live is to understand the word "perform". What he gives out in concert is from his soul and can't be bottled or easily traded on the net. You'll know when you see him that you have witnessed one of the greats.

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