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How to do a wet foot fit test...

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Uploaded on Sep 9, 2009

Hi there. Chris P. from the Zappos performance team and today we're going to show you how to do the wet test. Now, the wet foot test is actually a good way to figure out the height of your arch and therefore figure out if you are a neutral runner, a supinator/underpronator, or an overpronator. So, we have three beautiful specimens of Zappos employees here that we're gonna use today, myself included. And we've got three different heights of arches here for you, so you can actually see the different heights on the wet foot test.

First we're gonna start out with Josh. Fill up the bucket of water just a little way -- just enough to cover your arch. What we're gonna do is let that drip dry a little bit, shake it off, and then we're gonna put the arch on this brown piece of paper here. Now newspaper can work, construction paper, anything that's going to leave an imprint of that arch. So Josh, if you could go ahead and get that in there. Now we're going to have to step off to the side so you can see the arch. Let that drip dry. And then go ahead and put your arch down, stand straight, and then step off. So what we have here, you can see the nice little imprint that Josh left here. Josh has what we would call a medium arch. Now this is what most people are going to have. This is the area you're looking at, really, generally speaking. His arch band is sort of a medium height. This type of person typically, with a medium arch, is going to be one of two things: a neutral runner or a runner that's going to need a little bit of support from a medial post of the shoe. How we know the difference is just how flexible the arch really is. So, if he has a super stiff arch, he's not going to be rolling inward too much, but if he has a more flexible arch, his arch is going to be coming down as he's running to give a little bit more stability. Now, shoes like that you're gonna find -- like this shoe for example, a person that rolls inward is looking for this medial post, this gray area on the inside of the shoe. This is designed to give you more stability and to keep you more aligned so you don't get shin splints or knee pains or anything like that. That's Josh for you, and this is what we call a mild overpronation, or neutral.

Our next guy, Matt, is gonna show you what a fairly low arch looks like. Just dip that in there all the way. Make sure your heel is in there. Shake that off a little bit and you can step down on this piece of paper here. Good balance, balance is key. Now just put all your weight on that. The key here is you want to try to get as most of your foot on here as possible to give a really good indication of your arch. This is starting to dry off right here, but you can see his arch area kind of covers in here. You can see a lot more surface area is covered with his foot than, say, on Josh's foot. Now on flat feet like Matt has here, you're usually looking at the motion control category. This runner characteristically, when you have low arches, is not looking for a whole lot of cushioning. Cushioning can be important, but stability is key here. Flat arches are overpronating pretty severely in most cases. They're going to require a bit more of that motion control shoe. And the shoe that Matt's wearing today is called a Brooks Beast, and this has a huge medial post and a really flat outsole and midsole so you can see how it compares pretty well here. As you're rolling inward, he's not going to get those shin splints and knee pains and back pains that we were just talking about.

The last one, I have a fairly high arch, a little bit higher than Josh's but we'll show you the difference on a high arch. If I step on here and apply all my pressure, I have a bit higher arch than Josh has. You see the area that we're looking at is a little bit more narrow through here. Typically, this higher-arched person is going to be your neutral runner or your supinator, someone who's rolling to the outside of your foot. This type of person will usually require something that doesn't have a medial post, so you're missing that gray area that we just saw, say on this Nimbus right here. This person, when they're rolling to the outside of the foot, they have a more neutral gait cycle. They're looking for as much cushion as possible. You want to stay away from that stability. That's the three types of that you're really looking at when you do the wet foot test. While it's not 100 percent, it's going to get you probably more than 80 percent of the way there to picking the right running shoe.

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