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Prostitution has been legalized in Northeast Ohio

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Published on Nov 17, 2010

Prostitution has finally been legalized in Northeast Ohio, it's about time. There is a new store opening up in The Liberty Plaza called "Hoes." You can buy anything in Youngstown.

Youngstown is a city in the US state of Ohio and the county seat of Mahoning County;[3] it also extends into Trumbull County.[4] The municipality is situated on the Mahoning River, approximately 65 miles (105 km) southeast of Cleveland and 61 miles (100 km) northwest of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Youngstown has its own metropolitan area, but is often included in commercial and cultural depictions of the Pittsburgh Tri-State area and Greater Cleveland.[5] Youngstown lies 10 miles (16 km) west of the Pennsylvania state line, midway between New York City and Chicago via Interstate 80.
The city was named for John Young, an early settler from Whitestown, New York, who established the community's first sawmill and gristmill.[6] Youngstown is located in a region of the United States that is often referred to as the Rust Belt. Traditionally known as a center of steel production, Youngstown was forced to redefine itself when the U.S. steel industry fell into decline in the 1970s, leaving communities throughout the region without major industry.[7] Youngstown also falls within the Appalachian Ohio region, situated amongst the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains. The 2010 census showed that Youngstown had a total population of 66,982,[8] making it Ohio's ninth largest city.
According to the 2010 Census, the Youngstown-Warren-Boardman Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) contains 565,773 people and includes Mahoning and Trumbull counties in Ohio, and Mercer County in Pennsylvania.[8] The Steel Valley area as a whole has 763,207 residents.[9]
Youngstown was named for New York native John Young, who surveyed the area in 1796 and settled there soon after.[10] On February 9, 1797, Young purchased the township of 15,560 acres (63 kmĀ²) from the Western Reserve Land Company for $16,085.[11] The 1797 establishment of Youngstown was officially recorded on August 19, 1802.[12]
The area constituting present-day Youngstown was part of the Connecticut Western Reserve, a section of the Northwest Territory reserved for settlers from the state of Connecticut.[13] While many of the area's early settlers came from Connecticut, Youngstown attracted a significant number of Scots-Irish settlers from neighboring Pennsylvania.[14] The first European Americans to settle permanently in the area were Pittsburgh native James Hillman and wife Catherine Dougherty.[15] By 1798, Youngstown was the home of several families who were concentrated near the point where Mill Creek meets the Mahoning River.[13]
As the Western Reserve's population grew, the need for administrative districts became apparent. In 1800, territorial governor Arthur St. Clair established Trumbull County (named in honor of Connecticut Governor Jonathan Trumbull), and designated the smaller settlement of Warren as its administrative center, or "county seat".[16] In 1813, Trumbull County was divided into townships, with Youngstown Township comprising much of what became Mahoning County.[17] The village of Youngstown was incorporated in 1848, and in 1867 Youngstown was chartered as a city. It became the county seat in 1876, when the administrative center of Mahoning County was moved from neighboring Canfield.[18]
The discovery of coal by the community in the early 19th century paved the way for the Youngstown area's inclusion on the network of the famed Erie Canal. The Pennsylvania and Ohio Canal Company was organized in 1835, and the canal was completed in 1840.[19] Local industrialist David Tod, who was later Ohio governor during the Civil War, persuaded Lake Erie steamboat owners that coal mined in the Mahoning Valley could fuel their vessels if canal transportation were available between Youngstown and Cleveland. The arrival of the railroad in 1856 smoothed the path for further economic growth.[20]
Youngstown's industrial development changed the face of the Mahoning Valley. The community's burgeoning coal industry drew hundreds of immigrants from Wales, Germany, and Ireland. With the establishment of steel mills in the late 19th century, Youngstown became a popular destination for immigrants from Eastern Europe, Italy, and Greece.[21] In the early 20th century, the community saw an influx of immigrants from non-European countries including what is modern day Lebanon, Israel, and Syria. By the 1920s, this dramatic demographic shift produced a nativist backlash, and the Mahoning Valley became a center of Ku Klux Klan activity.[22] The situation reached a climax in 1924, when street clashes between Klan members and Italian and Irish Americans in neighboring Niles led Ohio Governor A. Victor Donahey to declare martial law.[23] By 1928, however, the Klan was in steep decline; and three years later, the organization sold its Canfield, Ohio, meeting area, Kountry Klub Field.

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