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Sitchin: Planet X Nibiru News

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Published on Feb 7, 2009

the discovery of new planets in the last two hundred years owes more to mathematics than to bigger telescopes. Mathematical irregularities in the orbits of the outer planets, in particular, strange wobbles and gravitational anomalies noted in the orbits of Uranus, Neptune and Pluto, have prompted astronomers over the past hundred years to search for a large planetary body in the outer solar system. Based on mathematical evidence, astronomers have been so sure of the reality of this planet that they named it Planet X. The name stands for the tenth planet, as well as the mathematical symbol for an unknown quantity. http://www.planetxvideo.com On June 17, 1982, a NASA press release from Ames Research Center officially recognized the possibility of "some kind of mystery object" beyond the outermost planets. Various press releases around this time confirmed that scientists were indeed looking for the infamous Planet X. For instance, Astronomy magazine published an article in December of 1981 entitled "Search for the Tenth Planet," and another article in October of 1982 entitled "Searching for a Tenth Planet." In addition, Newsweek covered the story of Planet X on June 28, 1982 in an article entitled "Does the Sun Have a Dark Companion?" This article implied that the tenth planet actually orbits a two sun (binary star) system, but we cannot see the other sun because it is a "dark" star. The article stated: "A 'dark companion' could produce the unseen force that seems to tug at Uranus and Neptune, speeding them up at one point in their orbits and holding them back as they pass. The best bet is a dark star orbiting at least 50 billion miles beyond Pluto. It is most likely either a brown dwarf, or a neutron star. Others suggest it is a tenth planet since a companion star would tug at the other planets, not just Uranus and Neptune." The Washington Post covered the story of Planet X on the front page on December 31, 1983 called "Mystery Heavenly Body Discovered." This story reported that the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) detected heat from an object about fifty billion miles away. A report of an interview with chief scientist Gerry Neugebauer from Jet Propulsion Laboratories appeared in the story. The article stated: "A heavenly body possibly as large as the giant planet Jupiter and possibly so close to Earth that it would be part of this solar system has been found in the direction of the constellation Orion by an orbiting telescope aboard the U.S. infrared astronomical satellite. 'All I can tell you is that we don't know what it is,' said Gerry Neugebauer, chief IRAS scientist." The Post article went on to explain that this mysterious object has never been seen by optical telescopes on Earth or in space, but its infrared heat signature was detected twice by IRAS as it scanned the northern sky between January and November of 1983. The second infrared observation of the body, which is so cold it casts no light, noted that the body appeared not to have moved in six months. This suggested that the object is not a comet, since it probably would have moved. The article also explained that the infrared telescope aboard IRAS, which is able to detect very cold objects, calculated that the heavenly body was so cold that its temperature is about 459 F below zero.
Astronomers suggested it was a "giant gaseous planet, as large as Jupiter," and is so close that "it would be the nearest heavenly body to Earth beyond the outermost planet Pluto." This would make it part of our solar system. The article explained that there had been some speculation that the object "might be moving toward Earth." However, Cal Tech's Neugebauer was careful to "douse that idea with as much cold water as I can." He pronounced with certainty that this object "is not incoming mail." The US News World Report on September 10, 1984 published an article called "Planet X - Is it Really Out There?" This article had the following to say about Planet X: "Shrouded from the sun's light, mysteriously tugging at the orbits of Uranus and Neptune, is an unseen force that astronomers suspect may be Planet X - a 10th resident of the Earth's celestial neighborhood. Last year, the infrared astronomical satellite (IRAS), circling in a polar orbit 560 miles from the Earth, detected heat from an object about 50 billion miles away that is now the subject of intense speculation."
Zecharia Sitchin on Planet X Nibiru

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