Upload

Loading...

What can a New Zealand reptile tell us about false teeth?

3,362

Loading...

Loading...

Transcript

The interactive transcript could not be loaded.

Loading...

Loading...

Rating is available when the video has been rented.
This feature is not available right now. Please try again later.
Uploaded on Sep 7, 2010

See full press release here: http://bit.ly/M88QUP

Using a moving 3D computer model based on the skull and teeth of a New Zealand reptile called tuatara, a BBSRC-funded team from the University of Hull, University College London and the Hull York Medical School has revealed how damage to dental implants and jaw joints may be prevented by sophisticated interplay between our jaws, muscles and brain.

The tuatara is a lizard-like reptile that has iconic status in its homeland of New Zealand because its ancestors were widespread at the time of the dinosaurs. Unlike mammals and crocodiles which have teeth held in sockets by a flexible ligament, tuatara have teeth that are fused to their jaw bone - they have no ligament, much like modern dental implants.

See more BBSRC videos here: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/news/videos/

See BBSRC News for the latest news, features and events: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/news

Follow BBSRC on Twitter: http://twitter.com/bbsrc

Loading...

Sign in to add this to Watch Later

Add to