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José Delgado, implants, and electromagnetic mind control

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Published on Jan 2, 2013

1985 CNN Special Report on Electromagnetic Mind Control featuring José Delgado and his famous 1965 experiment with an implanted bull.

Military affairs specialist Chuck DeCaro:

Electronic mind-control research is not new. A scientific milestone in this area came in the 1960s when Dr. Jose Delgado demonstrated remote control over a charging bull.

By connecting a radio antenna to electrodes inserted into the bull's brain, Delgado proved that the animal's aggressive impulses could be thwarted by electronically manipulating the bull's muscle reflexes.

Delgado

Do you realize the fantastic possibilities if from the outside we could modify the inside; could we give messages to the inside?

But the beauty is that now we are not using electrodes.

DeCaro

In recent years Delgado has shown that the behavior of monkeys can be altered using low-power pulsing magnetic fields. But in these experiments, there were no antenna implants.

Delgado

Any function in the brain -- emotions, intellect, personality -- could we perhaps modify by this non-invasive technology.

DeCaro

Delgado's research has so far been limited to animals.*

But in the Soviet Union a radio frequency, or RF, device has been used for over 30 years to manipulate the moods of mental patients. [ Lida machine ]

Transcript: http://iron-eagles.tripod.com/article...

Video source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lgJ6S...

For more information, please visit: http://www.skewsme.com/implants.html and http://skewsme.com/tinfoilhat/chapter...

* From Delgado's 1969 book, "Physical Control of the Mind: Toward a Psychocivilized Society"

"For example, in one of our patients, electrical stimulation of the rostral part of the internal capsule produced head turning and slow displacement of the body to either side with a well-oriented and apparently normal sequence, as if the patient were looking for something. This stimulation was repeated six times on two different days with comparable results. The interesting fact was that the patient considered the evoked activity spontaneous and always offered a reasonable explanation for it. When asked "What are you doing?" the answers were, "I am looking for my slippers," "I heard a noise," "I am restless," and "I was looking under the bed." In this case it was difficult to ascertain whether the stimulation had evoked a movement which the patient tried to justify, or if an hallucination had been elicited which subsequently induced the patient to move and to explore the surroundings."

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