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The Book of Isaiah KJV

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Published on Apr 20, 2016

Isaiah http://jesuscares411.weebly.com/

This is the first of the four major prophets (Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel and Daniel), that is, those prophets the book of each of whom comprises its own scroll. Isaiah wrote about 8 centuries before Christ and he tried to keep God's people on the right path. They strayed and fell as a nation into exile, although God would not leave them there and eventually restored them to their homeland. Chapters 1-39 compose the first major portion of the book and warn the people of punishment if they are not faithful. Chapters 40-55 are sometimes referred to as Second (Deutero) Isaiah, as they seem to be written toward the end of the people's period of exile in Babylonia . Chapters 56-66 are sometimes referred to as Third (Trito) Isaiah and deal with the period following the exile. The spirit of this book spans the Hallelujah Chorus of Christmas to the Suffering Servant Songs of Holy Week. We read in Isaiah's pages a hopeful message that we with our sins, though like scarlet, can be made white as snow (ch. 1), and that God's mountain in the end will be the highest (ch. 2); that Isaiah's life-work was based on a call (ch. 6), and that one day a special circumstance will transpire regarding a virgin and a child (ch. 7); that Isaiah had a son named “Speedy-spoil-quick-booty” (ch. 8), and that the people walking in darkness will see a great light (ch. 9); that God sometimes uses the enemies of God's own people to be a corrective force (like Assyria) but is just as quick to correct the corrector when they take all the credit themselves (ch. 10); we hear of someone special (a shoot) coming along (sprout) from the family of King David's father Jesse (the stump) (ch. 11); we see a rather disturbing image of an apocalyptic day (ch. 13); we hear a possible Calvary-related reference to “a signal being hoisted on a mountain” (ch. 18); we encounter a mouth-drooling passage when we hear about rich food and choice wine (ch. 25) and an Old Testament reference to the dead coming back to life (ch. 26); we hear a very good Penitential passage (ch. 30:18-26) and we hear about ostriches, hyenas and vultures (ch. 34); astronomical anomalies are experienced with the sun itself coming to a standstill (ch. 38) and we hear the familiar Advent themes of Comfort for God's people, Preparing the way for the Lord, and the Leveling of every mountain and valley (ch. 40); we have the 4 Suffering Servant Songs (42: 1-9; 49:1-6; 50:4-11; and 52:13-53:12); we hear the familiar Easter invitation to come to the water (ch. 55) and a correction for sticking out one's tongue (ch. 57:4); we see how we are like clay and God like the potter (ch. 64), how the wolf and the lamb can be at peace (ch. 65) and how peace itself should be flowing like a river (ch. 66).

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