Loading...

Transit of Venus across the Sun (June 5, 2012)

9,190 views

Loading...

Loading...

Transcript

The interactive transcript could not be loaded.

Loading...

Rating is available when the video has been rented.
This feature is not available right now. Please try again later.
Published on Jun 5, 2012

Transit of Venus across the Sun recorded from the official Sun-Earth Day live webcasts produced by Astronomers Without Borders from the historic Mount Wilson Observatory in Los Angeles County, California and by NASA EDGE from the summit of Mauna Kea in Hawaii on Tuesday, June 5, 2012. The next two transits of Venus will not occur again until 2117 and 2125. (Video Copyright © 2012 Astronomers Without Borders® and NASA EDGE)

Unfortunately, the weather did not cooperate in rain city Vancouver, BC, Canada where this rare event started around 3:00 p.m. PDT (6:00 p.m. EDT; 2200 GMT) and lasted for about seven hours. In Asia, Australia, Africa and Europe, the transit took place on Wednesday, June 6.

Sun-Earth Day live webcasts: http://sunearthday.nasa.gov/transitof...

Astronomers Without Borders: http://www.astronomerswithoutborders....

NASA: http://www.nasa.gov/


From Wikipedia: A transit of Venus across the Sun takes place when Venus passes directly between the Sun and Earth, becoming visible against (and hence obscuring a small portion of) the solar disk. During a transit, Venus can be seen from Earth as a small black disk moving across the face of the Sun. The duration of such transits is usually measured in hours (the transit of 2004 lasted six hours). A transit is similar to a solar eclipse by the Moon. While the diameter of Venus is more than 3 times that of the Moon, Venus appears smaller, and travels more slowly across the face of the Sun, because it is much farther away from Earth.

Transits of Venus are among the rarest of predictable astronomical phenomena. They occur in a pattern that repeats every 243 years, with pairs of transits eight years apart separated by long gaps of 121.5 years and 105.5 years. The periodicity is a reflection of the fact that the orbital periods of Earth and Venus are close to 8:13 and 243:395 commensurabilities.

The latest transit of Venus occurred on June 5 and 6, 2012, and will be the last Venus transit this century; the prior transit took place on June 8, 2004. The previous pair of transits were in December 1874 and December 1882. After 2012, the next transits of Venus will be in December 2117 and December 2125.




Additional tags: TV Glenn Research Center Alice Springs Norway Much Hoole UK Horrocks Fairbanks Alaska IAO Hanle Ladakh European Space Agency Fairbanks Astronomical Unit Solar Dynamics Observatory SDO National Institute of Aerospace Columbus State University Coca-Cola Space Science Center Centralian Middle School CCSSC team students live images wavelengths 90mm Hydrogen-alpha 60mm Calcium K-line Mongolia International Space School Education Trust Gobi Desert transformers Spitsbergen parallax effect AU measurements Live Projection NASA feed St. Michael's Church Clarinet Saxophone duet 1st first 2nd second contact third 3rd fourth 4th Indian Astronomical Observatory world highest station webcast aaadelhi Via IIA VP AAAD Engineers European Space Astronomy Centre ESA Venus Express satellite visible H-alpha telescope images Svalbard Arctic Michael Fassbender Canberra Marshall Space Flight Center Huntsville Alabama creation destruction entertainment USA zodiac astrology Mercury mars Jupiter Saturn Uranus Neptune Pluto spaceship spacecraft 20th century fox astronaut cosmonaut Moon historic rare event mass gas County rain disk destruction creation

Loading...

When autoplay is enabled, a suggested video will automatically play next.

Up next


to add this to Watch Later

Add to

Loading playlists...