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Top 10 Largest Cities or Towns of American Samoa

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Published on Jun 10, 2014

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1) Pago Pago
2) Tafuna
3) Leone
4) Faleniu
5) Aua
6) Mapusagafou
7) Fagatogo
8) Vaitogi
9) Malaeimi
10) Vailoatai

American Samoa is an unincorporated territory of the United States located in the South Pacific Ocean, southeast of Samoa.

American Samoa consists of 5 main islands and 2 coral atolls. The largest and most populous island is Tutuila, with the Manuʻa Islands, Rose Atoll, and Swains Island also included in the territory. American Samoa is part of the Samoan Islands chain, located west of the Cook Islands, north of Tonga, and some 300 miles (500 km) south of Tokelau. To the west are the islands of the Wallis and Futuna group.

The 2010 census showed a total population of 55,519 people. The total land area is 199 square kilometres (76.8 sq mi), slightly more than Washington, D.C. American Samoa is the southernmost territory of the US and one of two US territories (with Jarvis Island) south of the Equator. Tuna and tuna products are the main exports, and the main trading partner is the US.

Contact with Europeans began in the early 18th century. Jacob Roggeveen (1659--1729), a Dutchman, was the first known European to sight the Samoan islands in 1722. This visit was followed by the French explorer Louis-Antoine de Bougainville (1729--1811), who named them the Navigator Islands in 1768. Contact was limited before the 1830s which is when English missionaries and traders began arriving.

Early Western contact included a battle in the eighteenth century between French explorers and islanders in Tutuila, for which the Samoans were blamed in the West, giving them a reputation for ferocity. The site of this battle is called Massacre Bay.

Mission work in the Samoas had begun in late 1830 when John Williams of the London Missionary Society arrived from the Cook Islands and Tahiti.[4] By that time, the Samoans had gained a reputation for being savage and warlike, as violent altercations had occurred between natives and European visitors. Nevertheless, by the late nineteenth century, French, British, German, and American vessels routinely stopped at Samoa, as they valued Pago Pago Harbor as a refueling station for coal-fired shipping and whaling.

In March 1889, a German naval force invaded a village in Samoa, and by doing so destroyed some American property. Three American warships then entered the Apia harbor and prepared to engage three German warships found there.[5] Before guns were fired, a typhoon wrecked both the American and German ships. A compulsory armistice was called because of the lack of warships.

Source:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American...

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