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Al Gore: Half Man, Half Possum, Total Idiot --The Disease of Empire--

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Uploaded on Aug 13, 2008

Aug.5 (LPAC) -- Like Al Gore's uncontainable paunch, Bangladesh's landmass is increasing, and defying forecasts by global warming doomsayers that the South Asian nation will be under the waves by the end of the century. After examining 32 years of satellite images, scientists from the Dhaka-based Center for Environment and Geographic Information Services (CEGIS) say Bangladesh's landmass has increased by eight square miles annually.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the UN agency responsible for global warming propaganda, has predicted that impoverished Bangladesh, criss-crossed by a network of more than 200 rivers, will lose 17 percent of its land by 2050 because of rising sea levels due to global warming, and 20 million Bangladeshis will become environmental refugees.

However, the truth is quite different, says Maminul Haque Sarker, head of the department at the Bangladeshi government-owned center that looks at boundary changes. Sarker said "satellite images dating back to 1973 and old maps earlier than that show some 1,000 square kilometers (400 sq miles) of land have risen from the sea."

Mahfuzur Rahman, head of Bangladesh Water Development Board's Coastal Study and Survey Department, explains why. The country which lies at the delta of the huge Ganges-Brahmaputra river system is gaining ground from natural build up of silt. "For almost a decade we have heard experts saying Bangladesh will be under water, but so far our data has shown nothing like this," Rahman said. "Natural accretion has been going on here for hundreds of years along the estuaries and all our models show it will go on for decades or centuries into the future."

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