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Fukushima farmers describe what it's like to harvest poisoned food...

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Published on Sep 3, 2013

"We won't eat it ourselves, but we sell it."

And they are encouraged to do so! And they won't be able to feed their families if they don't. It's a tragedy all around.


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Comment by David Bear on this video and its transcript:
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"In the agricultural policy managed by the Ministry of Agriculture, it is a priority to dispel the harmful rumor about Fukushima produce."

The above quote is from within the transcript (below). It clearly demonstrates the International Atomic Energy Agency's agenda: to dispel the 'harmful rumors' about contaminated agriculture. And here's how it's done.

First, you define the level of contamination which is "acceptable" (this is based on the International Council of Radiation Protection [ICRP]; these are the guys who did the radiological studies after Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 and 1946 and they created the standards of "acceptable" radiation exposures based on those studies. It is important that you understand this, because DNA wasn't discovered until 1952 (Watson & Crick) and radiological damage to DNA is much more subtle and happens at much lower levels of exposure. It is also important to understand that the ICRP has so far refused to adjust their "acceptable" limits to include considerations for damage to DNA).

Second, you do some generalized surveys, take the average readings and round them off (round them down to the next lowest number) and define that as the "limit" (this does not take into account actual levels of contamination at any particular location). (Of course, you say that any levels of contamination above that "limit" is a problem which will be studied and addressed.)

Third, you define the 'perceived problem' as a 'rumor.'

Fourth, you back it up by saying that the concentration of contamination (i.e., the 'rumor', is below the "acceptable" limits.

And here is the transcript [see link]:

-- David Bear


A full transcription of this video is available here:
http://goo.gl/Hv0aqU

(Thanks to Lissette Roldan for providing the transcription!)

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Ace Hoffman's current (August 29, 2013) essay on Fukushima is titled: Building Sand Castles in a Rising Tide... http://goo.gl/IhVTZF

Ace Hoffman's description of spent fuel hazards (~30minutes): http://youtu.be/xfVx-UysJoI

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