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Homemade Memristor

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Uploaded on Aug 29, 2011

About ten years ago while walking up this mountain road, I noticed a lot of small gravel and the smell of sulfur.

I also found some empty brass rifle cartridges in the gravel that had turned to a dark black color from corrosion.

After returning home, I proceeded to investigate the electrical properties of the black crud on the cartridges.
I layed a piece of aluminum on a cartridge and connected both of them to the curve tracer.

This typical pattern was often produced when ac voltage was applied across the aluminum and cartridge.

I recorded this in my notes as a curious memory phenomenon but didn't think much more about it until recently browsing the web and becoming aware of the memristor and the amount of attention it is getting.
Since the device shown here seems to fit very closely, all of the descriptions I've read about memristors, I decided that some might find this video interesting.

The exact middle of the screen is zero voltage and current. Notice how the curve always passes through zero. This is one of the requirements to qualify as a memristor.

Pieces of copper or lead that had been sitting in some powdered sulfur for a long time also acted as memristors.

Placing a small pile of powdered sulfur on a piece of copper sheet for just a few hours produced a black area that worked well as a memristor when in contact with a piece of aluminum.

The memristor is in series with pushbutton S1, an LED and enough voltage to light the LED. The LED shows the status of the memristor whenever S1 is pushed and closed. When the memristor is on it's resistance is low and the LED will light. When the memristor is off it's resistance is high and the LED will not light.

To turn the memristor on, S2 is added in series with a current limiting resistor and a 9 volt battery.

To turn the memristor off, S3 is added in series with a current limiting resistor and another 9 volt battery in the opposite polarity.

See more stuff at sparkbangbuzz.com

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