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♥ "Amapola" (Once Upon a Time in America)

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Published on Aug 8, 2010

Music: Amapola
Artist: Stuart Matthewman
Album: Twin Falls Idaho (Soundtrack from the Motion Picture)

from Wikipedia:

"Amapola (Pretty Little Poppy)" is a 1924 song by Cádiz-born composer José María Lacalle García (later Joseph Lacalle), with Spanish lyrics. After the composer died in 1937, English language lyrics were written by Albert Gamse.
Miguel Fleta sang "Amapola (Pretty Little Poppy)" in the 1925 film "The Lecuona Cuban Boys"; Deanna Durbin in the 1939 film "First Love"; and Alberto Rabagliati in a 1941 film. Japanese singer Noriko Awaya released her version of the song in 1937. A popular recorded version was made later by the Jimmy Dorsey Orchestra with vocalists Helen O'Connell and Bob Eberly; this was released by Decca Records as catalog number 3629 and arrived on the Billboard charts on March 14, 1941, where it stayed for 14 weeks and reached #1. Another version, with vocals in English, was recorded by Spike Jones and his City Slickers in the unforgettable comic style of his band; the flip-side was Jones Polka, a drinking-song, sung in a strong European accent. Since its debut "Amapola" has been a favorite recording of opera tenors: Tito Schipa (1926), Alfredo Kraus (1959, Luigi Alva (1963), and, most notably, the 1950 recording by Jan Peerce.
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This music is one of the music used as soundtrack of the movie
"Once Upon a Time in America."

"Once Upon a Time in America" is a 1984 epic crime film directed and co-written by Sergio Leone and starring Robert De Niro and James Woods. The story chronicles the lives of Jewish ghetto youths who rise to prominence in New York City's world of organized crime. The film explores themes of childhood friendships, love, lust, greed, betrayal, loss, broken relationships, and the rise of mobsters in American society.
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