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According to wikipedia.com, "Jaws of sharks, like those of rays and skates, are not attached to the cranium. The jaw's surface (in compar...
According to wikipedia.com, "Jaws of sharks, like those of rays and skates, are not attached to the cranium. The jaw's surface (in comparison to the shark's vertebrae and gill arches) needs extra support due to its heavy exposure to physical stress and its need for strength. It has a layer of tiny hexagonal plates called "tesserae", which are crystal blocks of calcium salts arranged as a mosaic.[23] This gives these areas much of the same strength found in the bony tissue found in other animals.
Generally sharks have only one layer of tesserae, but the jaws of large specimens, such as the bull shark, tiger shark, and the great white shark, have two to three layers or more, depending on body size. The jaws of a large great white shark may have up to five layers.[21] In the rostrum (snout), the cartilage can be spongy and flexible to absorb the power of impacts."
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