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  • WHY ARE YOU HERE?

    227 views 4 months ago
    Why are you here? I grabbed my camera and peddled up the hill to Cal Anderson Park at 9am on Saturday, to ask a random sampling of 30 marchers (out of a sea of tens of thousands!) why they had braved the rain and cold and commute logistics to be there on a Saturday morning (talk about civically engaged! Go Seattle liberals!) And some other questions.

    Based on the Q&A with folks, I think the March was broader this year, which is why I chose "Peaches: Boys Want To Be Her" as the theme song (thank you to my #gusband, a former techie and continued audiophile with feminist tastes for the recommendation). Toward the end of the song, they chant, "voices scatter" and I think that's fitting for the 2018 Women's March, which encapsulated anger and statements (signs) going beyond women and minority rights. Trump did and said and instigated all the evil he said he would. There's a collective backlash, illustrated here with hundreds of thousands of people gathering in the major cities - and small towns!

    That said, the march was thus emboldened with a diverse set of messages against the "shit" going on in DC, strengthening the overall, shared sentiment. It was about showing strength and "a collective energy" as one said, to fight Donald Trump in the midterm elections and show the "power in numbers" (as another said) that we have when we come together and vote. "Sweep all the bastards out." :). Here are what the major themes I heard were:

    Women's rights
    Pro-Immigration and DACA
    Anti-Trump
    Protest wage gap and tax cuts for super rich
    Environmental rightst
    Anti-GOP
    Get out the vote
    Show power in numbers

    There was a smattering of comic relief, which added to the inviting temperament of the crowd. #GrabEmByTheMidterms was being held by two friends, standing on a stoop above the crowd. "The best part is the signs" said one woman about the march. A group of college women I met up with said their favorite thing was how "when one person did something everyone else chimed in" and how that "became like a wave" - I'm not making this up, they said that! A march is really a wave. Actually... why don't we call it a wave anyway? Marching is so military, and this is anything but.

    What energy.

    Go Seattle and the #bluewave

    Why are you here? I grabbed my camera and peddled up the hill to Cal Anderson Park at 9am on Saturday, to ask a random sampling of 30 marchers (out of a sea of tens of thousands!) why they had braved the rain and cold and commute logistics to be there on a Saturday morning (talk about civically engaged! Go Seattle liberals!) And some other questions.

    Based on the Q&A with folks, I think the March was broader this year, which is why I chose "Peaches: Boys Want To Be Her" as the theme song (thank you to my #gusband, a former techie and continued audiophile with feminist tastes for the recommendation). Toward the end of the song, they chant, "voices scatter" and I think that's fitting for the 2018 Women's March, which encapsulated anger and statements (signs) going beyond women and minority rights. Trump did and said and instigated all the evil he said he would. There's a collective backlash, illustrated here with hundreds of thousands of people gathering in the major cities - and small towns!

    That said, the march was thus emboldened with a diverse set of messages against the "shit" going on in DC, strengthening the overall, shared sentiment. It was about showing strength and "a collective energy" as one said, to fight Donald Trump in the midterm elections and show the "power in numbers" (as another said) that we have when we come together and vote. "Sweep all the bastards out." :). Here are what the major themes I heard were:

    Women's rights
    Pro-Immigration and DACA
    Anti-Trump
    Protest wage gap and tax cuts for super rich
    Environmental rightst
    Anti-GOP
    Get out the vote
    Show power in numbers

    There was a smattering of comic relief, which added to the inviting temperament of the crowd. #GrabEmByTheMidterms was being held by two friends, standing on a stoop above the crowd. "The best part is the signs" said one woman about the march. A group of college women I met up with said their favorite thing was how "when one person did something everyone else chimed in" and how that "became like a wave" - I'm not making this up, they said that! A march is really a wave. Actually... why don't we call it a wave anyway? Marching is so military, and this is anything but.

    What energy.

    Go Seattle and the #bluewave Show less
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