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Omni Potent

U.S AirForce

1,106 views 3 years ago
http://www.rand.org/news/pr...
F/A-22
The F-22 engines produce more thrust than any current fighter engine. This allows the F-22 to efficiently cruise without afterburner.

The F-22's integrated avionics give it first-look, first-shot, first-kill capability that guarantees the U.S air dominance for the next 40 years.

By processing 10.5 billion instructions per second, the onboard avionics allow the pilot to see a complete view of the battlefield.

The Raptor's radar changes frequencies more than 1,000 times per second to reduce the chance of bieng intercepted.

The Radar can also focus its emissions to overload enemy sensors, giving the plane an electric-attack capability.

F-35 The Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II is a family of single-seat, single-engine, fifth-generation multirole fighters under development to perform ground attack, reconnaissance, and air defense missions with stealth capability.[7][8] The F-35 has three main models; the F-35A is a conventional takeoff and landing variant, the F-35B is a short take-off and vertical-landing variant, and the F-35C is a carrier-based variant.

The F-35 is descended from the X-35, the product of the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) program. It is being designed and built by an aerospace industry team led by Lockheed Martin. The F-35 took its first flight on 15 December 2006. The United States plans to buy 2,443 aircraft. The F-35 variants are intended to provide the bulk of its tactical airpower for the U.S. Air Force, Marine Corps and Navy over the coming decades.

JSF development is being principally funded by the United States with additional funding from partners. The partner nations are either NATO members or close U.S. allies. The United Kingdom, Italy, Israel, The Netherlands, Australia, Canada, Norway, Denmark, and Turkey are part of the development program; Japan has ordered the F-35, while Singapore may also equip their air force with the F-35

A-10 The Fairchild Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II is an American single-seat, twin-engine, straight-wing jet aircraft developed by Fairchild-Republic in the early 1970s. The only United States Air Force aircraft designed solely for close air support of ground forces, the A-10 was built to attack tanks, armored vehicles, and other ground targets with limited air defenses.

The A-10 was designed around the GAU-8 Avenger, a rotary cannon that is the airplane's primary armament and the heaviest such cannon mounted on an aircraft. The A-10's airframe was designed for survivability, with protective measures such as 1,200 pounds (540 kg) of armor to enable the aircraft to continue flying after taking significant damage.

The A-10's official name comes from the Republic P-47 Thunderbolt of World War II, a fighter that was particularly effective at close air support. The A-10 is more commonly known by its nicknames "Warthog" or "Hog". It also has a secondary mission, where it provides airborne forward air control, directing other aircraft in attacks on ground targets. Aircraft used primarily in this role are designated OA-10. With a variety of upgrades and wing replacements, the A-10's service life has been extended to 2040.
Read more
http://www.rand.org/news/pr...
F/A-22
The F-22 engines produce more thrust than any current fighter engine. This allows the F-22 to efficiently cruise without afterburner.

The F-22's integrated avionics give it first-look, first-shot, first-kill capability that guarantees the U.S air dominance for the next 40 years.

By processing 10.5 billion instructions per second, the onboard avionics allow the pilot to see a complete view of the battlefield.

The Raptor's radar changes frequencies more than 1,000 times per second to reduce the chance of bieng intercepted.

The Radar can also focus its emissions to overload enemy sensors, giving the plane an electric-attack capability.

F-35 The Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II is a family of single-seat, single-engine, fifth-generation multirole fighters under development to perform ground attack, reconnaissance, and air defense missions with stealth capability.[7][8] The F-35 has three main models; the F-35A is a conventional takeoff and landing variant, the F-35B is a short take-off and vertical-landing variant, and the F-35C is a carrier-based variant.

The F-35 is descended from the X-35, the product of the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) program. It is being designed and built by an aerospace industry team led by Lockheed Martin. The F-35 took its first flight on 15 December 2006. The United States plans to buy 2,443 aircraft. The F-35 variants are intended to provide the bulk of its tactical airpower for the U.S. Air Force, Marine Corps and Navy over the coming decades.

JSF development is being principally funded by the United States with additional funding from partners. The partner nations are either NATO members or close U.S. allies. The United Kingdom, Italy, Israel, The Netherlands, Australia, Canada, Norway, Denmark, and Turkey are part of the development program; Japan has ordered the F-35, while Singapore may also equip their air force with the F-35

A-10 The Fairchild Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II is an American single-seat, twin-engine, straight-wing jet aircraft developed by Fairchild-Republic in the early 1970s. The only United States Air Force aircraft designed solely for close air support of ground forces, the A-10 was built to attack tanks, armored vehicles, and other ground targets with limited air defenses.

The A-10 was designed around the GAU-8 Avenger, a rotary cannon that is the airplane's primary armament and the heaviest such cannon mounted on an aircraft. The A-10's airframe was designed for survivability, with protective measures such as 1,200 pounds (540 kg) of armor to enable the aircraft to continue flying after taking significant damage.

The A-10's official name comes from the Republic P-47 Thunderbolt of World War II, a fighter that was particularly effective at close air support. The A-10 is more commonly known by its nicknames "Warthog" or "Hog". It also has a secondary mission, where it provides airborne forward air control, directing other aircraft in attacks on ground targets. Aircraft used primarily in this role are designated OA-10. With a variety of upgrades and wing replacements, the A-10's service life has been extended to 2040. Show less
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