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Development is Where the Money is

In 1992, the devastating 16-year civil war in Mozambique finally came to an end. Nearly a third of the population had fled from their homes , infrastructure throughout the country had collapsed and the means of production rendered ineffective and worthless. The following decade was marked by a failure of government that meant production and the economy had little chance of recovery.

Nonetheless, the last twenty years have seen Mozambique turned around into what is considered by the World Bank to be an 'aid success story' with a growing GDP rate of nearly 8% per year . This figure, however, belies the continuing rates of poverty in rural areas, home to 80% of the country's poor households , where the majority rely on agriculture to survive. Here, two thirds of the population are illiterate , access to water and healthcare are still limited and market connectivity is hampered by a poor road network, isolation and fractured supply chains.

Despite the apparent disparity between the continued poverty and the overall economic successes of the country, there are very bright prospects for Mozambique. Some 88% of the agricultural land is uncultivated so investment into the agricultural sector will not only help to boost the economy as a whole, but also the livelihoods of the country's poorest people who struggle to subsist in the current climate.

Economic forecasts are phenomenal and promise a better future for the country in the coming decades. The challenge is to ensure that the rural poor will be able to share in that prosperity.
In 1992, the devastating 16-year civil war in Mozambique finally came to an end. Nearly a third of the population had fled from their homes , infrastructure throughout the country had collapsed and the means of production rendered ineffective and ...
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