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Hinder - Topic

Take It to the Limit Play

Like their former tourmates and eternal soulmates Buckcherry, Hinder work real hard to have a real good time. This is especially true on Take It to the Limit, a sequel to their 2005 debut, Extreme Behavior, where they take their surprise success as vindication for bad behavior. Hinder show a great love for Guns N' Roses, recycling the escalating chromatic riff from "Sweet Child O' Mine" on the album-opening pair of "Use Me" and "Loaded and Alone," which also finds lead singer Austin Winkler adopting an Axl Rose growl, which is a welcome departure from his node-busting scream. Not that Hinder is quite stuck in the past: their great innovation is marrying this raunch to Goo Goo Dolls power ballads. However, like anybody too beholden to their idols, they often tread familiar ground too carefully. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, Rovi

Welcome to the Freakshow [Clean] Play

According to Austin Winkler, Welcome to the Freakshow, the fourth studio album from Oklahoma-based post-grunge/sleaze rockers Hinder, was created in the throes of "a really, really dark drug binge" that resulted in a post-recording hospital stint for the notoriously rowdy frontman, suggesting that the band had finally reached the rehab portion in its extremely long reading of Mötley Crüe's The Dirt: Confessions of the World's Most Notorious Rock Band. While Freakshow may have been conjured in darkness, it's hardly a downer, offering up 11 tracks that run the gamut from crass, high-energy "underbite rock" anthems ("Save Me," "See You in Hell," "Wanna Be Rich") to lighter-melting power ballads ("Should Have Known Better," "Talk to Me," "Anyone But You"). ~ James Christopher Monger, Rovi

The All American Nightmare Play

Hinder have a lot invested in being the bad boys of rock & roll, of being the "All American Nightmare." Of course, their conception of danger is tied to the late ‘80s, when the hellions of Hollywood escaped from L.A. to rule America and elsewhere. Hinder is proud to be conservative, boasting “Just leave the Jack and take your Hennessy/Take your Kanye out of my player please/that Zeppelin 45 is staying with me" on the staunchly anti hip-hop “Hey Ho,” and they live so far in the past they don’t quite realize how their power ballads evoke the Reagan years. The new wrinkles are the Nickelback grind of “Striptease,” and strumming singalongs in the vein of Uncle Kracker. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, Rovi

Extreme Behavior Play

Released in September 2005, Hinder's Extreme Behavior revives the riffs and misogynistic tone of 2001 albums from Puddle of Mudd and Nickelback for a whole new batch of undergrads. This isn't so much post-grunge as it is straight-up dude rock. The artwork is a triggered response collage of lingerie and Jäger, and the music blares like a stereo left on in the keg room, all swear words and electric guitar blab. Hinder singer Austin Winkler is a stand-in for Nickelback's Chad Kroeger, and his lyrics? Like the chorus of lead single "Get Stoned" that asserts sex is better when the participants are angry and high, Winkler doesn't show a lot of class on Behavior. Hinder do try a little tenderness here and there. They sound like a heavier Wallflowers on "Nothin' Good About Goodbye," and "Lips of an Angel" carries the power ballad torch complete with a soaring solo stolen from hair metal's golden era. "Homecoming Queen" is another take on the good-girl-tarnished-by-big-bad-L.A. story; it's also a pretty obvious rewrite of Guns N' Roses' "Sweet Child o' Mine." For the most part, Hinder are all about big dumb rock, the kind of stuff that's happily ignorant of common courtesy or trying much of anything new musically. ~ Johnny Loftus, Rovi
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