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Euler Cascading Wave Spring, Load Test for White Paper , by Dr. Rory R Davis Ph.D, PE

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Published on Jun 7, 2012

A short white paper of this study is available, free. Comment Please - so I can show you how to duplicate the process with various materials. Two US patents have been issued using this effect. Currently looking into viable mechanical applications using this effect. Looking for under-grads or others that would want to study the effect for their papers. Mathematical, physical and mechanical studies would be interesting. Looking applied applications to a product to build a business and make $$$$$.

A Cascading Standing Wave can be produce by this new variation of Euler's contained column theory. A preset bell curve is formed by constricting the material laterally and clamping its ends to a lower platen. The bell curve is position between two platens for compression. A compressive force is then applied in the downward direction. As the bell curve is compressed it shifts to form a relatively low frequency sine wave. As the downward force increases, the system shifts to a progressively higher wave frequency with corresponding lower amplitude. This effect continues till the radius of the waves becomes prohibitively small and the yield strength of the material is passed. If the force is removed prior to passing the yield point of the material, the flexible spring material will return to its original shape. The force needed to shift the curve to the higher frequency waveform increases at an exponential rate, as opposed to the linear rate of most normal springs. The threshold force needed to convert the low frequency wave to the higher energy level wave is much greater than the maintenance force used to keep the waveform in its new stable state. Such a relatively light weight spring with an exponential load / deflection curve with a self dampening effect, through phase change, could have a number of useful mechanical applications.

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