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Campaign 2012: Foreign Aid

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Published on Apr 6, 2012

Whoever is in the White House in 2013 will have to retain the relevancy of U.S. foreign aid programs in an environment where the role of official foreign assistance from governments has dramatically reduced, says Isobel Coleman, director of CFR's Civil Societies, Markets, and Democracy Initiative.

The next administration will likely continue to shift aid resources away from Iraq and Afghanistan, and away from middle-income countries towards poorer countries, Coleman says.

The United States will also seek opportunities to collaborate with the private sector and other countries' foreign aid programs to maximize the impact of foreign assistance efforts, she says.

This video is part of Campaign 2012, a series of video briefings on the top foreign policy issues debated in the run-up to the 2012 elections: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=...


http://www.cfr.org/foreign-aid/video-...

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