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F101 with J57 flys to 100,000 feet as told by Test Pilot Harry Schmidt

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Uploaded on Apr 7, 2011

The New England Air Museum and the American Institute of Aeronautics & Astronautics (AIAA) are co-sponsoring a program titled The Engines of Pratt & Whitney to be held at the Air Museum on the evening of Tuesday, April 5, 2011. The program will run from 7:00 -- 9:00 P.M. and is free to Museum members and AIAA members. Please Note: The Museum will close at 5:00 P.M. on the evening of the lecture and will reopen for guests at 6:30 P.M.
A description of the program follows:
Among Pratt & Whitney's half million engines there are five significant programs that changed aviation history. These were bold moves by men with vision and dedication to advance the state of the art in aircraft engines when the prevailing wisdom was against them. The program consists of an overview of P&W's most significant programs and a detailed review of one of these programs -- how P&W managed to dominate the aircraft gas turbine market right after World War II.
Jack Connors, author of The Engines of Pratt & Whitney will start off with an overview of P&W's five significant programs and then join fellow P&W retirees, Ted Slaiby and Harry Schmidt, in a discussion of the engine technology and the flight test program that launched the J57 in the B-52 program. Nobody predicted that this engine would soon launch the Century Series of fighters and luxurious jet aircraft travel with Boeing and Douglas. A relatively short time afterwards the J57 hardware was modified to create the TF33 turbofan. This new type of engine made the B-52H possible because of its greater thrust and lower fuel consumption. The fallout from this engine led to further opportunities in military and commercial aviation.
This is an exciting engineering story to hear at the New England Air Museum. These three former engineers will be available afterwards to show you the airplane and engine hardware and respond to your questions -- An educational evening for engineers and non-engineers.
This is a rare opportunity to hear the story from those who were active participants in the J57 program in the 1950s!

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