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How to Micro Rocket Stove - Urban Survival

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Uploaded on Dec 7, 2011

bugout-canada.ca The world's smallest rocket stove! 180 grams. 3.5" diam. by 4.5" high.

This micro rocket stove is small enough to fit into your b.o.b. or backpack and uses improvised fuels like wood, cardboard, dung, grasses, pine cones, and more. It shares many similarities with a hobo stove.

The magazine loader is removable and stores in the main body that's made from a stainless cup and lid. It was designed for use with pots, pans, canteen cups, sierra cups, kleen kanteens and more.

This super lightweight stove is ideal for ultra light campers and the backyard gardener alike. Whether you're heating up an improvised shelter, boiling some water on the go, or brewing up some wild herbal tea in the backyard, this little stove let's you travel light and leave a small footprint.

I made this stove for my bug out bag system that also happens to be my camping backpack. I was lacking a stove and was thinking about using some kind of ultra light liquid fuel stove but could never get past the idea of running out of fuel. Plus carrying liquid fuel introduces an element of danger.

I checked on google to see if anyone else had made a similar product for sale and found that there was nothing as small and lightweight. Since I was carrying s/s cups in my b.o.b. anyway, I decided to use the materials from my existing system to make a mini, or micro stove.

First I cut out a rectangular hole for the magazine loader (chute). Then I cut a large opening in the top and added some air vents on the top outside edge. The vents allow for greater air exchange when a cup or pot is covering the opening. Next I cut a magazine out of a piece of duct work using tin snips. I folded the duct material into a rectangular shaped chute and did the same to create two horizontal slots in the chute. Wood goes on the top slot and the bottom slot is for air intake.

For the carrier I modified some surplus Canadian military magazine pouches to accommodate a 500 mil stainless steel Kleen Kanteen and a stainless steel cup and lid.

To light this stove, or any rocket stove, place some paper and kindling in the main chamber to start a fire inside the stove. Once a decent fire is established add wood to the fire by using the magazine loader (chute).

With an outside temperature of -1 C It only took about 3 minutes to get this cup of cold water boiling. A lid was used to achieve a rolling boil.

This project was fun, easy and cheap. Thanks for watching.

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