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Rosé Wine from Chinon In The Loire Valley In France.Producer Philippe Pain

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Uploaded on Feb 27, 2010

Rosé Wine from Chinon In The Loire Valley In France.Producer Philippe Pain

Chinon wine comes from the vineyards around the town of Chinon in Touraine. Unusually for the Loire Valley, it is mostly red wine, with 2-5% rosé and a little white wine.

The reds and rosés are made from Cabernet Franc (known locally as Cabernet Breton), with an allowance of 10% Cabernet Sauvignon. They are typically dry and light to medium bodied and go well with food. In good vintages the red wines can be cellared for 10 years or more. Cabernet Franc grown on the stony terraces of the area tends to be a young wine with dominant notes of blackcurrant and anise. The wines from the steeper rockier areas along the hills that separate the Loire from the Vienne tend to produce wines that are more tannic and express the more austere terroir in a range of alkaloid flavors that give the wines a mineral, gamey complexity and a strong tannic backbone. These wines also tend to develop a velvety depth of spice flavors as they age. Though typically thought of as lighter wines, reds from good producers and strong vintages can be full bodied and well structured for aging. Their whites are composed primarily of Chenin Blanc. They are typically described as dry, soft, light, and clean.

The town of Chinon is situated on the banks of the river Vienne in Indre-et-Loire. The vinyards of the Chinon AOC cover the relatively steep banks of the Vienne as well as the less steep slopes running northward from the hills above Chinon to the Loire. The vineyards consist almost entirely of erosional scree and gravels on top of rather hard Turonian limestones. Toward the Loire itself the Turonian limestones give way to the Jurassic rock of the Loire.

Chinon is a commune in the Indre-et-Loire department in central France.
In the Middle Ages, Chinon developed especially during the reign of Henry II (Henry Plantagenêt, Count of Anjou, crowned King of England in 1154). The castle was rebuilt and extended, becoming one of his favorite residences.
Chinon was included in the French royal estates in 1205. It was during the Hundred Years' War that the town took on a new lease of life, as the heir apparent, the future Charles VII of France, had sought refuge in 1418 in the province. The town remained faithful to him and he made lengthy stays at his court in Chinon. In 1429, Joan of Arc came here to acknowledge him.
From the sixteenth century, Chinon was no longer a royal residence.

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