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Electronic Plastics: Flexible Solutions for Today's Energy Challenges and Tomorrow's Wired World

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Uploaded on Sep 29, 2010

Explore the use of organic molecular materials and polymers for mechanically flexible displays, solid-state lighting, and large-area solar cells. Currently, devices for such electronic applications have relied heavily on inorganic semiconductors. Compared to inorganics, plastics are lightweight and mechanically flexible. They can easily adopt a wide range of form factors and can be manufactured in large volumes at costs that are a fraction of their inorganic counterparts.

Lynn Loo, Ph.D. is an associate professor in the Chemical and Biological Engineering Department of Princeton University. Her many awards include a DuPont Young Professor Award, a Beckman Young Investigator Award and a Sloan Fellowship. She will be one of two young scientists representing the U.S. at the World Economic Forum's Summer Davos Meeting in Tianjin, China this fall.

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