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A Working Pallophotophone - 1922 audio recording method

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Uploaded on May 13, 2010

History in Audio Recording: The only working pallophone in the world(2010), plays back the earliest radio station recordings ever made. It used light bouncing off a tiny mirror to expose a strip of film. A photoelectric cell is used to read the recordings. The film recorded waveforms of sound as tiny black stripes. Demonstration on kodak acetate film. Invented by Charles Hoxie, this lead to the RCA Photophone motion picture system. The machine was built by Russ DeMuth of the GE Global Research Center in 2009-2010. Research and presentation by Chris Hunter of the Schenectady Museum. WGY was recorded in 1922, hear the NBC chimes which started at WGY Radio Station. WGY reached an audience as far away as South Africa and was the voice of General Electric. The pallophotophone preceded magnetic recording. A strip of audio was used along side film to do sound with film. By 1927 the "Jazz Singer" came out which was the first sound film in the entertainment industry.

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