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Dont Leave Me (Instrumental) - Holland & Dozier

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Uploaded on Jul 17, 2009

Another blessed 45 find in the the garage!

From Wiki:The trio came together at Motown Records. Eddie Holland, in fact, had been working with Motown founder Berry Gordy prior to that label being formed; his 1958 Mercury single "You" was one of the earliest Gordy productions. Later, Eddie Holland had a career as a Motown recording artist, scoring a US top 30 hit in 1961 with "Jamie".

Eddie's brother Brian Holland was a Motown staff songwriter who also tasted success in 1961, being a co-composer of The Marvelettes' US #1 "Please Mr. Postman". Dozier had been a recording artist for a few different labels in the late 1950s and early 1960s, including the Anna label (owned by Berry Gordy's sister) and Motown subsidiary Mel-o-dy.

The three came together to create material for themselves and other artists, but soon found they preferred being writer/producers to being performers. (especially Eddie, who suffered from stage fright and retired from performing in 1964.) They ended up writing and producing dozens and dozens of songs recorded by artists on contract to Motown Records, including 25 Number 1 hit singles such as "(Love is Like a) Heat Wave" for Martha & the Vandellas and "How Sweet It Is (To Be Loved By You)" for Marvin Gaye. Their most celebrated productions were probably the singles they created for The Four Tops and The Supremes, including ten out of The Supremes' 12 US #1 singles, such as "Baby Love", "Stop! In the Name of Love", and "You Keep Me Hangin' On".

In 1967, H-D-H entered a dispute with the founder and head of Motown Records, Berry Gordy Jr., over profit sharing and royalties. Eddie Holland had the others stage a work slowdown, and by early 1968 the trio had left the label. They started their own labels, Invictus Records and Hot Wax Records, which were only somewhat successful. Motown sued for breach of contract, and H-D-H countersued. The subsequent litigation was one of the longest legal battles in music industry history. Because of the lawsuit, H-D-H were forced to give composer credits on their earliest Invictus/Hot Wax recordings to the team of "Wayne/Dunbar". The lawsuit was settled in 1977 with H-D-H paying Motown a mere several thousand dollars in damages.[citation needed]

Dozier left Holland-Dozier-Holland Productions, Inc. (HDHP) during the early 1970s to resume his career as a solo performing artist. From the mid-1970s onwards, HDHP, with Harold Beatty replacing Dozier, wrote and produced songs for a number of artists. Curiously, HDHP worked on material for Motown artists, including the Supremes and Michael Jackson, even while its litigation against Motown Records was still pending. Lamont Dozier commented in 2008, "The lawsuit was just our way of taking care of business that needed to be taken care of -just like Berry Gordy had to take care of his business which resulted in the lawsuit. Business is business, love is love."[3]

Lamont Dozier has his own production company and continues to work as a solo artist, producer and recording artist, while the Holland Brothers own HDH Records and Productions (without any participation from Lamont Dozier), which issues recordings from the Invictus and Hot Wax catalogs as well as new material.

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